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Convoy of Hope's Disaster Services Team preps for a response at the World Distribution Center in Springfield, Mo. Convoy of Hope's Disaster Services Team preps for a response at the World Distribution Center in Springfield, Mo.

Prepared and ready for next disaster

One of the reasons Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services Team is regularly one of the first to respond to disasters is preparation.

“After every disaster we start preparing for the next one,” says Chris Dudley, disaster services response director. “All our equipment is checked, cleaned, repaired and organized so that we’re ready at a moment’s notice.”

In addition to being prepared, members of Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services Team monitor storms, earthquakes and other disasters 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

“We are constantly gathering critical information on events in the United States and around the world so that we can move quickly and efficiently in times of disaster,” adds Dudley. “We’re grateful for the supporters who have invested in Convoy of Hope so that we can bring help and hope to people in need.”

Currently our Disaster Services team is coordinating relief efforts in response to the Ebola Crisis in West Africa. Containers of food are currently en route. So far this year, the team has monitored 909 disaster events around the world.

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Disaster Services

Hope isn’t expensive

If you’ve heard Hal Donaldson speak, you know that he has a way with finding just the right words to make you aware of something that you already wholeheartedly believe in but never had words for. A couple years back, he was talking to our team and did exactly that when he said, “hope is not expensive, but it does cost us something.” If I remember right, Hal was making a charge for Convoy of Hope staff to go beyond our employment and find ways to give people hope with our personal lives.

You’re reading the last in a series about hope. We don’t have the corner on hope, but we experience all sides of it every day and we thought we ought to dedicate some blog posts to sharing the hope that we have with you. Catch up on posts one, two, three and four.

Odds are that your profession is not centered around delivering hope to people facing hard situations. However, that doesn’t mean you can’t spend yourself on behalf of others. Think of the places where people are: at work, at grocery stores, in the United States, around the world, driving, in parenthood, at school, at restaurants, at the beach (I have a few words for you if you’re at the beach.) The places where people are, are the places that need the hope you have. Giving hope to people where you are doesn’t require a change of profession, but it will cost you something. In most cases it will cost you time, some cases money, others a smile, but in every case the return will exponentially outweigh your investment. Jesus is probably most quoted for saying; “give and it will be given to you.”

Hope makes daily work of turning down people’s doubts while turning up the corners of their mouths. 

Try it out. Start wearing your hope on your sleeve, or maybe on your forehead. ZendayaHOPEblog

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Inspiration