There is hope in every storm.

We are highly regarded for our scalable distribution model, Disaster Services teams, six international warehouses and a Mobile Command Center. Consistently, we are among the first to respond to disasters throughout the world. We have helped millions of people in the aftermath of disasters by working with and through churches, businesses, government agencies and other nonprofits.

Why Respond?

In 1998, we responded to our first disaster — flooding in Del Rio, Texas, after Tropical Storm Charley. Since then, we have responded to hurricanes, typhoons, ice storms, earthquakes, tornadoes, wildfires and floods in the United States and throughout the world. Our goal? To give people help and hope in times of great need. Already, we’ve responded to more than 225 disasters and have had the opportunity to bring food, water, ice, emergency supplies and long-term solutions to families reeling from tragedy.

Our Impact

  • Impact Icon

    234

    International and domestic disaster responses.
  • Impact Icon

    2,117

    Tractor trailers of food and relief supplies distributed to people facing disaster.
  • Impact Icon

    3,575,005 3.58 m

    Total volunteer hours.
  • 37,548

    Disaster response volunteers.
  • 1,516

    Local church and organization partners.

Our Approach

  • Monitoring

    Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Response Teams constantly monitor developing weather situations, earthquake activity, wildfires and other forms of natural disasters from the team’s Operations Center at our World-Distribution Center in Springfield, Mo. By staying up to date on potential situations we are able to deploy assessment teams and supplies immediately.

  • Assessment

    Our Disaster Response Team consistently sends assessment teams to the field to gauge our level of response. In many instances our teams are on the ground even before a storm passes. Our assessment teams gather critical information and report that back to our Operations Center where the scope of our response is determined.

  • Response

    Disaster response efforts vary depending on the nature of a disaster but typically consist of rotating response teams in the field and the shipment of loads of disaster relief supplies from our World-Distribution Center. Teams in the field distribute relief supplies to storm survivors, coordinate volunteers and assist in cleanup efforts. Coordination with local, state and federal officials is also an essential part of our disaster response work.

  • Recovery

    Long after the media’s spotlight has lifted from a disaster area we continue our work for months, sometimes even years. Our goal is not only to be one of the first organizations to respond to a disaster, but also one of the last to leave. In doing so, we bring immediate and long-term relief to those who are suffering.

Experts in the field

Nick Wiersma

Volunteer Services Director - Disaster Response

Nick Wiersma has been on the front lines of numerous disaster responses in places such as: Haiti, Chile, New York, Japan, Oklahoma and the Philippines. He’s clocked countless hours helping others in their time of need yet he’s quick to credit his colleagues and volunteers for their support and dedicated teamwork.

Project Spotlight

Joplin Homes

Rebuilding smarter and stronger.

In 2011, we broke ground on the first of 13 disaster-resistant and energy-efficient homes for survivors of the May 2011 EF-5 tornado that left a mile-wide swath through Joplin, Mo. In 2014, another family will have the peace of mind of owning a brand-new, energy-efficient home that is disaster resistant.

Our response to the Philippines

Browsing: View Blog

Convoy of Hope Europe: Alik’s story

Alik is an inspiration. As a child, he lost the use of both legs from disease and learned to walk on his hands, dragging his legs behind. But this didn’t stop him from attending a Convoy of Hope Europe event in Glinjeni three years ago.

Since then the COHEU team has stayed in close contact with Alik. They provided him with new furniture and renovated and cleaned his home and property. He was also given a modified bike that he pedals with his hands. Thanks to the bike, Alik is finally able to transport himself independently for the first time in his life.

Read more of Alik’s story at COHEU’s website.

#Hopedemic is catching on all over the world! Download a #hopedemic profile pic, timeline pic, or timeline banner here.

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Program Updates
Shipping Hope Shipping Hope

Along with our partners and friends like you, we’re shipping hope to people that need it. In the past three weeks we have shipped 18 containers with 760,000 lbs. of food and relief supplies to Armenia, Guatemala, Haiti, Lebanon, Liberia, Kenya, Panama, South Africa, and Sierra Leone. These containers include aid supplies for the ebola crisis in Liberia and Sierra Leone.

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Program Updates
Convoy of Hope's Disaster Services Team preps for a response at the World Distribution Center in Springfield, Mo. Convoy of Hope's Disaster Services Team preps for a response at the World Distribution Center in Springfield, Mo.

Prepared and ready for next disaster

One of the reasons Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services Team is regularly one of the first to respond to disasters is preparation.

“After every disaster we start preparing for the next one,” says Chris Dudley, disaster services response director. “All our equipment is checked, cleaned, repaired and organized so that we’re ready at a moment’s notice.”

In addition to being prepared, members of Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services Team monitor storms, earthquakes and other disasters 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

“We are constantly gathering critical information on events in the United States and around the world so that we can move quickly and efficiently in times of disaster,” adds Dudley. “We’re grateful for the supporters who have invested in Convoy of Hope so that we can bring help and hope to people in need.”

Currently our Disaster Services team is coordinating relief efforts in response to the Ebola Crisis in West Africa. Containers of food are currently en route. So far this year, the team has monitored 909 disaster events around the world.

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Disaster Services