Hope partners for good.

We empower like-minded organizations that do good work among the poor and suffering in their communities. This is accomplished by providing such friends with food, water, supplies and much more.

Why Resource Others?

Convoy of Hope’s partners are crucial to our work responding to disasters, holding community outreaches and implementing life changing feeding initiatives throughout the world. Each year corporations donate tens of millions of dollars’ worth of food and supplies to Convoy of Hope, which we in turn distribute throughout channels and also through partner organizations bent on making a difference in their communities.

Our Impact

  • Impact Icon

    $413,526,589 $413.53 m

    Worth of food, water and relief supplies procured since 1994.
  • Impact Icon

    305,772,387 305.77 m

    Pounds of food, water and relief supplies distributed since 1994.
  • Impact Icon

    $63,996,404 $64 m

    Worth of food, water and relief supplies distributed in 2013.
  • 14

    International warehouses and offices throughout the world.
  • 8,728

    Tractor-trailer loads delivered since 1994.

Our Approach

  • Gift-in-kind Partners

    Partnerships with companies, organizations and other private donors that donate/provide excess product, services or inventory to assist Convoy of Hope in carrying out our goals of providing help and hope to people worldwide through our Children’s Feeding Initiative, community outreaches, disaster response and partner resourcing.

  • Corporate Partners

    With the support of our corporate partners, every dollar donated to Convoy of Hope is leveraged into more food, water and supplies for those who need it most.

  • Church Partners

    By connecting with churches nationwide and providing them an opportunity to partner with Convoy of Hope, tens of thousands of children are being fed regularly, people are being helped in times of disasters, and struggling families are helped at the organization’s community outreach events. Churches are vital to Convoy of Hope’s financial and volunteer base.

Experts in the field

Erick Meier

Vice President -- Supply Chain

Erick Meier leads a team that secures and moves product through our World-Distribution Center in Springfield, Mo., to distribution points around the world. Whether it be for our disaster response work or for our community outreach events or for our children’s feeding sites in 11 countries, our supply chain is critical to our work to bring help and hope to those who are suffering or in need.

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Jason Streubel, Ph.D and director of agriculture for Convoy of Hope, sits on a Kubota tractor preparing the soil behind our World Distribution Center for a Community Garden. Jason Streubel, Ph.D and director of agriculture for Convoy of Hope, sits on a Kubota tractor preparing the soil behind our World Distribution Center for a Community Garden.

Cultivating Hope with Community Gardens

On a cloudy day in a field behind Convoy of Hope’s World Distribution Center in Springfield, Mo., Jason Streubel, Ph.D and director of agriculture for Convoy of Hope, sits on a Kubota tractor grinning from ear-to-ear.

Here, in the heart of the city of more than 160,000 residents, an eight-foot barbed wire fence surrounds land on one side. On the other, a deer darts into a wooded area. The smell of freshly-tilled soil fills the air.

Streubel will use this half-acre in collaboration with local universities to plant fall crops and conduct variety trials. The team will collect soil samples, monitor growth rates and yield, and harvest crops.

“This field allows us to do research,” says Streubel. “As our organization gains academic credibility, it opens up relationships so that we can improve our techniques and feed more children.”

According to Streubel, the study also provides opportunity for grants that can be used to develop agriculture initiatives worldwide. Community gardens like this one have also been launched to aid the working poor in targeted areas, like Detroit. In Haiti, 3,600 farmers have been trained by Streubel’s team in management practices specific to their region.Cultivating Hope 1 Cultivating Hope 3

COMMENT
Agriculture / Program Updates

In Plains, Mt., members of this small, rural town of 1,000 are putting their hands to work to meet the needs of their community. One way is by falling, splitting and delivering free firewood to those who need it to survive the tough, long winters of Montana. They’re using local resources to provide local solutions. And helping resource and train them along the way has been members of our Rural Compassion team. Pretty cool stuff.

Pastor Jim Sinclair of Church on the Move is at the helm of this effort and I was encouraged by his quote from a recent interview — “You can only be a sheep for a little while. Then you have to become a ranch hand.”

What steps can you take TODAY to stop being a sheep and become a ranch hand? Share your ideas on Facebook or Twitter and mention @convoyofhope.

COMMENT
Inspiration / Rural Compassion
Brian Nhira plays at Convoy of Hope Brian Nhira plays at Convoy of Hope

Brian Nhira visits Convoy of Hope

“My heart is arrested for #hope.”

Brian Nhira, a recent graduate of Oral Roberts University brought hope & inspiration to our team today. And thanks to our incredible leadership, we also scored Brian’s EP, titled HOPE.

Brian just returned from Zimbabwe where he toured for a month inspiring children and locals to never stop dreaming, even when hope is gone.

He’s currently recording his debut album, HOPE’S STAND and is looking for contributors to make it happen. Visit Brian Nhira’s site to listen in and learn more.

COMMENT
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