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The recent Empowered Girls graduation at Enaboishu High School in Arusha was consistent with the core of the Empowered Girls program – to teach girls life skills for success. It didn’t take visitors long to see the important life skills on display.

Girls from four Tanzanian schools wrote and recorded an album called “Watoto wa Afrika,” meaning “Children of Africa,” which was launched during the graduation. The album has songs about the challenges they face as girls, including some real-life situations they encounter. Some songs teach girls about how to resolve problems that come up, while others encourage girls and women to know their rights and to stand up for themselves.

Our Empowered Girls program has girls clubs in seven schools teaching topics like self-esteem, confidence, leadership, conflict resolution and study skills. Lessons are reinforced by fun activities like essay contests, fashion shows and of course songs.

Kellen Msseemmaa is an economics teacher at Enaboishu and is also the director of Empowered Girls. “It’s amazing to see the joy on the faces of the graduating girls on the stage, and to see their confidence,” she said. The girls take the songs back to their families and villages and teach others, so the lessons ripple through communities.

“Empowered Girls is important to Convoy of Hope because this is the best way to prepare the mothers of tomorrow,” said Elianchea Shang’a, Tanzania country director for Convoy of Hope.

One crowd favorite was “Fataki,” a song in three acts where the singer models how to handle bad situations.

‘The message was loud and clear,” said Emanuel Chikoti, who works for Convoy of Hope.  “Girls can stand firm and say ‘no’ to allowing men to take advantage of them.”

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