Justin Thomas Plays for Hurricane Florence Survivors at PGA Tour Championship Justin Thomas Plays for Hurricane Florence Survivors at PGA Tour Championship

Justin Thomas to raise money for Convoy of Hope during PGA Tour Championship

Birdie 1 – Round 1 – Hole 6 = $1,000 Birdie 2 – Round 1 – Hole 10 = $1,000
Birdie 3 – Round 1 – Hole 11 = $1,000 Birdie 4 – Round 1 – Hole 12 = $1,000
Birdie 5 – Round 1 – Hole 15 = $1,000 Birdie 6 – Round 2 – Hole 2 = $1,000
Birdie 7 – Round 2 – Hole 4 = $1,000 Birdie 8 – Round 2 – Hole 6 = $1,000
Birdie 9 – Round 2 – Hole 15 = $1,000 Birdie 10 – Round 2 – Hole 18 = $1,000
Birdie 11 – Round 3 – Hole 6 = $1,000 Birdie 12 – Round 3 – Hole 10 = $1,000
Birdie 13 – Round 3 – Hole 13 = $1,000 Birdie 14 – Round 3 – Hole 17 = $1,000
Birdie 15 – Round 3 – Hole 18 = $1,000 Birdie 16 – Round 4 – Hole 2 = $1,000
Birdie 17 – Round 4 – Hole 8 = $1,000

TOTAL: $17,000

For the third year in a row, professional golfer and 2017 PGA TOUR player of the year, Justin Thomas will partner with Convoy of Hope to raise money for hurricane relief efforts. During the PGA Tour Championship, Justin has pledged to donate $1,000 for every birdie and $5,000 for every eagle he makes to Convoy of Hope’s Hurricane Florence disaster response.

Justin, his sponsors and fans generated more than $90,000 in donations over the past two year to help Convoy’s hurricane relief efforts. Justin is currently ranked 4th on the PGA’s Official World Golf Ranking and has had seven PGA Tour wins.

“We are thrilled Justin is partnering with Convoy again this year. His support makes a difference in the work we are doing to help the individuals and communities affected by Hurricane Florence” said Rick Waggoner, Convoy’s vice president of development.

Join Justin in bringing help and hope to those in need!

Donate to Hurricane Florence Response

Check back throughout the weekend to see how Justin is doing.

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Advocacy / Join the Convoy / News

Four easy ways to be more prepared

Being prepared for a disaster is important, but oftentimes it can seem overwhelming. Insurance information is complicated, buying supplies for a full-fledged emergency kit can become expensive and frankly the thought of what would happen if you face a disaster can be mentally and emotionally draining. These are still important steps to take over time, but you can start small with these easy tips and become more prepared:

1. Download your local news station’s news or weather app.

If a disaster is on it’s way, you will want to know sooner rather than later. Your local news station should have an app that you can download. When you do, make sure to turn on push notifications. Doing so will mean you will get notified of important news and weather events like a disaster headed to your area.

2. Determine the safest part of your house (or your neighbors’).

If a disaster calls for evacuation, it’s important that you do so. However, if you are not told to evacuate, you should determine the safest part of your home. During most severe storms you want to be indoors, as low and as far from windows as possible — basements, first floor bathrooms, etc. If you live in an apartment building and do not live on the ground floor, consider making friends with those below you. In the case of a severe storm you may ask if you can take shelter with them.

3. Collect the basics

You can find a list for what to include in a full-fledged emergency kit at ready.gov and we encourage you to start collecting these items. However, it’s a long list and you may not be able to afford everything all in one shopping trip. So start with the basics:

  • Battery powered flashlight
  • External battery charger for your cell phone
  • Bottled water
  • Important family documents

4. Save both personal and professional emergency numbers in your phone. 

If a disaster does happen, it’s important to know who to call for help. Make sure you have these phone numbers saved in your phone:

  • Each member of your household
  • At least one out-of-town friend or family member that may be better able to reach family members in an emergency.
  • FEMA: 800-621-FEMA (3362)
  • Emergency services — Police and Fire Department
  • Utilities
  • Medical providers
  • Veterinarians
  • Insurance companies

Always remember that if you have a life-threatening emergency, call 9-1-1. You should also mark at least one friend or family member as “ICE” in your phone’s contacts, which stands for In Case of Emergency.  This will help emergency responders know who to contact on your behalf if there is a need.

You can learn more about how Convoy of Hope prepares for and responds to disasters in the video below and at convoyofhope.org/ds.

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Inspiration

Thousands attend a day of hope and peace in Chicago

More than 9,000 people came together Saturday, August 25 in south Chicago for a day of hope and peace. With the help of 104 local organizations, 60 churches and 1,400 volunteers, more that 7,700 Guests of Honor were served at Convoy of Hope’s Chicago Community Event.

The first family arrived outside the event that morning at 6 a.m. By the time the event started at 9 a.m., more than 1,250 people were lined up for the event.

Thousands of goods and services were distributed including 6,000 back-to-school backpacks, nearly 10,000 bags of groceries and more than 3,108 pairs of new children’s shoes. More than 4,800 people also received health services — including 217 flu vaccinations from Walgreens.

Guests of Honor also had the opportunity to meet with local organizations and career services groups, to make connections that would last long after the event ended. Chicago City Alderman David Moore thanked Convoy of Hope for “not just handing out fish, but teaching people to fish”.

Stats of the event:

  • 9,128 Total people on site
  • 7,728 Guests of Honor
  • 1,400 Volunteers
  • 60 Participating Churches
  • 104 Participating Organizations
  • 6,000 back-to-school backpacks distributed
  • 168 Haircuts by 16 stylists
  • 850 Family Portraits
  • 9,947 Grocery bags distributed
  • 12,000 meals prepared
  • 3,108 Children’s shoes distributed
  • 5,000 Bombas socks
  • 1,526 served by National Breast Cancer Foundation
  • 4,800 served in Health Services by 23 organizations
  • 217 Flu vaccinations by Walgreens
  • 276 served in Job and Career Services by 11 organizations plus 217 job applications plus 5 resumes
  • 547 served in Community Services by 28 organizations
  • 62 Veterans served by 17 organizations
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Community Outreach

Hope after Harvey: One year later

When reports began coming in, late August 2017, that tropical storm Harvey was headed for the coast of Texas and had the power to become a hurricane, Convoy of Hope began preparing. A large convoy of tracter-trailers and specialty disaster response vehicles headed for the Texas coast. Within hours of the hurricane making landfall Convoy of Hope was there — distributing relief supplies such as food, water and hygiene items.

 

A Post-Harvey Year

This week marks one year since Hurricane Harvey struck Texas causing massive flooding that resulted in an estimated $125 billion in damage. Come heat, rain and even snow, Convoy has remained in Texas in a longterm response effort.

In the last year since Harvey hit, Convoy of Hope has sent more than 10 million pounds of relief and rebuilding supplies to Texas. A warehouse was acquired in Baytown, where rebuilding materials such as sheetrock, dry wall and insulation were stored until they could be delivered to those trying to rebuild their homes.

The Mouton’s, one family affected, experienced more than 12 inches of water flooding their home, forcing them to remove all of the house’s drywall. They estimate they lost about 75% of their belongings —including furniture, appliances and pictures. That is where Convoy, with the help of our great supporters, was able to step in and bring hope.

Neighborhood Events

Convoy is also holding Neighborhood Events in Harvey-affected areas of southeastern Texas. At these events families can receive a warm meal, groceries, children’s shoes and more. The first Texas Neighborhood Event took place in Houston in early August 2018, where more than a thousand people attended.

“The goal of these events is to help these communities flip the switch from disaster to hope,” Disaster Community Care Outreach Director Mark Cox says.

You can continue to follow our work in Texas at convoyofhope.org.

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Disaster Services