Browsing Category: Inspiration

Walk for Water

Fourth graders at Rountree Elementary in Springfield, Missouri, spent six weeks studying water and the lack of access to clean water many people experience throughout the world. After hearing about the far distances people travel for water, the students decided to take action.

They designed and created their own water filters, and hosted a walk-a-thon where they invited other classes and community members to walk along with them. Through the event, they raised more than $500 to support Convoy of Hope’s clean water initiatives around the world.

“Through the walk-a-thon, our students had an opportunity to connect more with the situation faced by many without clean water and work for the money through sponsorships,” says Kelly Henkle, fourth grade teacher at Rountree “This gave the students more ownership of the money they donated.”

We are thankful for these awesome fourth graders that saw a need and wanted to do their part to help us bring hope to those who need it most!

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Inspiration / Join The Convoy

Little Heroes Help End Hunger

It’s not every day you meet a group of heroes who haven’t graduated middle school yet. But after hearing about children who suffer from hunger and poverty, kids from Mountain Top, Pennsylvania decided they wanted to help.

Michael, one of the oldest of the group, was saving up for something else but had a change of heart.

“He was saving up for an iPad,” his mom says. “But after he heard about One Day to Feed the World at church, he decided to give his savings to feed children instead.”

Katie worked hard to rake leaves and clean her room to raise money. It wasn’t as much what she did, but the attitude she portrayed that made it worthwhile. She knew every little bit she raised would go to help a kid like her.

Carlee called her grandma and asked if she would be willing to help her change the world. She packed her bags, headed to her grandma’s and did chores around the house to earn money. She didn’t stop there. After collecting that money, she wanted to give even more — she emptied her piggy bank and gave every last penny she had.

“I am forever changed by my involvement with Convoy of Hope,” says Pastor Debbie. “And it’s exciting to see our church kids get involved and raise money in fun ways to help other children.”

Without the hearts of people like Michael, Katie and Carlee, we would not be able to provide hope to the impoverished and suffering around the world. It’s kids like these who powerfully prove to us that no matter your age, you have the ability to change lives.

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Advocacy / Inspiration / Join The Convoy

I Am Syria

“I am Syria” is a powerful statement, especially coming from elementary school students in Charlotte, North Carolina. But that’s what the kids at the school wanted to do — make a statement.

Fourth and fifth graders at Nathaniel Alexander Elementary studied the refugee crisis and decided they wanted to do something to help kids who seemed just like them, but are facing the despair of living inside a humanitarian crisis.

“We try to focus on how we can do good for others,” says Nicole Nederlk, a teacher at the school. “It’s important for the kids to know what they’re giving towards.”

The kids raised money and wore green on a designated day to show their support. More than $500 was donated for Convoy of Hope’s response in the Middle East and Europe.

“I used to only care about myself,” says Danaiyah, a student at Nathaniel Alexander. “But now I know the importance of helping others.”

Jamie Waldron, outreach director for Elevation Church, helps out at the school in the food pantry and coordinates events. She recently visited Convoy’s work in Lebanon, so Jamie encouraged the kids to give the money they raised to Convoy of Hope. She showed them a video of the kids they would be helping.

“Some of the kids at Nathaniel Alexander don’t have much,” Waldron says. “But when they saw kids [on the video] that couldn’t go to school or didn’t have beds at all, they were moved to help.”

We’re thankful for children who are practicing compassion at such a young age. Because of them, we are able to bring hope and help to refugee children around the world.

 

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Advocacy / Inspiration / Join The Convoy

A Legacy of Kindness

Greek Philosopher Plato once said, “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a harder battle.” If that thought alone doesn’t inspire you to do something kind for Random Acts of Kindness Day, maybe Katrina’s story will.

Each year on January 14, Katrina takes off work to play another role. Katrina’s father, Jim, passed away a few years ago from early onset Alzheimer’s. Since then, each year on his birthday, Katrina spends the day spreading kindness to others.

“We would be celebrating if he were still here,” she says. “So now we just celebrate in a different way — a way that may change someone’s whole outlook.”

Each year, Katrina does random acts of kindness for each year of Jim’s life. This year, he would’ve been 64 so she set out on a mission to do 64 things for others. She dropped off flowers for mothers in the NICU at the hospital, took an ice cream party to Jim’s co-workers and dropped off treats to friends across the city.

One of those friends, Trina’s hairstylist, posted about the kindness she’d received on Facebook with the hashtags #64randomactsofkindness and #rememberingjim. Someone who Katrina didn’t know posted she, too, had been on the receiving end of Katrina’s kindness mission back on Jim’s 61st birthday. She received a note Katrina left in her locker at the gym with an inspirational quote on it and explained she still has the note on her refrigerator.

“You never know what someone’s going through,” says Katrina. “But I almost feel selfish about doing it because I enjoy it so much.”

She hopes that her kindness encourages others to be kind, too.

“It’s never a bad thing to show kindness — no matter how big or small,” Katrina adds.

She says her dad was always doing things for others and he wanted his daughters to learn the importance of that. When asked what her dad would say to her today, she gets emotional.

“I think he would say, ‘I lived my life the way I needed to and I raised my girls to be kind to others,’” Katrina says affectionately. “I think he would be proud.”

Ironically, as we finished our conversation at the local bakery, a barbershop quartet began singing to the employees making their food. It was a perfect, kindness-filled moment that proves kindness is everywhere.

“We all have time in our days to make someone feel special,” Katrina adds. “Being grateful and being kind is so important.”

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Inspiration