Browsing Category: Join The Convoy

Volunteer of the Year 2017

Becky Stegner was awarded a Convoy of Hope Key Award as Volunteer of the Year for 2017. Stegner has been a Lead Volunteer with Convoy for more than eight years.

Stegner has put in more than 1,000 hours of volunteer time at Hands of Hope, the weekly volunteer opportunity at Convoy’s World Distribution Center.

“Becky is one of those people who come along once in a great while,” Convoy of Hope Volunteer Engagement and Administration Director Lisa Nene says. “She is a dedicated volunteer who can take lead in any situation or project that is given to her.”

Before she was a lead volunteer, regularly attended Hands of Hope with her mother and sister. The family was looking for a good way to get together as a family after Stegner and her sister started college.

Now, Stegner spends her Tuesday nights leading other volunteers in bagging groceries for Community Events, filling bags of rice or pasta for Convoy’s Children’s Feeding Initiative and much more as the Hands of Hope projects change each week. Stegner even occasionally comes in on weekends to help with special projects outside of the normal Hands of Hope schedule.

Stegner says it’s the variety and the people she works with each week that keep her coming back.

“You’d get really burned out if it was the same old thing every week, if you didn’t have fun doing it, if you didn’t have friends that did it with you,” Stegner says.

Stegner encourages everyone grab a friend and come out to give Hands of Hope a try!

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Join The Convoy / Volunteering

Good vs. Great: Students supporting feedONE

feedONE Collegiate Coordinator Tom Trask and his wife, Missi, have served as the University of Missouri Chi Alpha Directors for 13 years. They have spent half of that time advocating for feedONE, by empowering their students in acts of compassion, generosity and kindness.

When the group took on feedONE as their philanthropy partner nearly six years ago, they wanted to find something that reached beyond their own campus.

GOOD VERSUS GREAT

“I want them to understand good versus great,” Trask says. “This is not something that is good—it’s something that is great.”

In their first year as a feedONE partner, the University of Missouri Chi Alpha chapter raised a little more than $1,400. This past November, the students raised more than $40,000 during their annual feedONE month.

The students participated in creative and competitive fundraising as a way to raise support for children in the feedONE program. One small group set up a car bash, while other students held bake sales, threw special dinners, played in dodgeball tournaments and performed music.

In March, a group of students volunteered at the Convoy of Hope World Distribution Center, bagging hygiene kits and more than 5,000 meals.

“The difference it has made in the heart of our students — when they see a need, they step up,” Trask says.

FEEDING THE FUTURE 

Tom and Missi continue to instill a passion for feedONE and encourage a life of compassion for students on the University of Missouri campus. They are not only changing the lives of the children in feedONE, but also the lives of students and future leaders.

As they continue to make an impact at the University of Missouri, Tom and Missi look forward to other universities and schools partnering with feedONE.

“Just to watch the compassion grow, it’s contagious,” Trask says. “It’s contagious to inspire each other to greater things.”

feedONE and Convoy of Hope are proud to partner with students and leaders, like Tom and Missi, who actively demonstrate their compassion and kindness for children across the world. Find out how to get involved on your campus today at feedone.com/campus.

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Advocacy / Children's Feeding / Inspiration / Join The Convoy / Volunteering

Students’ partner with Convoy of Hope in rocket stove competition

Students from Missouri State and Evangel University took to the Evangel courtyard Wednesday, March 21, to take part in a rocket stove competition, in partnership with Convoy of Hope.

The Applied Sustainability class, taught by Evangel Professor and Convoy of Hope Senior Director of Program Effectiveness and Training Jason Streubel, is a course designed to engage students in analyzing and solving the world’s humanitarian needs.

A rocket stove is a fuel and heat efficient stove, that uses combustion and ventilation to produce heat while conserving fuel. Usually found in developing countries, the cost efficient stove produces almost no smoke and is a staple in areas with a low supply of fuel sources.

We have a winner

Students were required to build their rocket stove out of household or repurposed items. The goal was to get the stove to boil a pot of water for 10 minutes at 100 degrees Celsius — the time and temperature required to sanitize contaminated water.

Scott McElveen, a graduate student in Missouri States Agricultural Science program, completed the ten minute boil. His rocket stove, a combination of coffee cans and aluminum foil, held 100 degrees for 14 minutes.

“If you were in a foreign country, you could drink that water,” McElveen said smiling.

How Convoy uses rocket stove technology

Convoy of Hope works in developing countries around the world through Children’s Feeding, Women’s Empowerment and Agriculture initiatives. To improve the lives of people we serve, we are beginning to implement clean stove technology.

“How do you burn a stove while being fuel efficient and heat efficient?” Streubel said. “That’s what we are trying to find out.”

Right now, a manufactured rocket stove would cost someone in Kenya about two days wages. In countries like El Salvador and Nicaragua, rocket stove materials are limited to natural resources like stone, brick, clay and cob.

One Missouri State student, Cady Goble, used cob to build her rocket stove. Her cob mixture — a combination of clay, sand and prairie grass — is a variation of what most people use to build rocket stoves in our program countries. Like many of the people we serve, Goble understands the benefits to using natural resources.

“Anyone can make it using the resources around them,” Goble said. “It’s also scalable, it could be used for someone’s home.”

Along with creativity, cost, and heat efficiency, scalability is one of the benefits Streubel analyzed.

“We want to produce this in a way that is not just good for individuals, but in a way that could provide for whole families—or even schools,” Streubel said.

Streubel is analyzing the successes and failures of the classes’ models and using them to further his team’s knowledge of rocket stoves and how to manufacture them on a larger scale. With this additional information, Convoy of Hope can continue to implement clean stove technology in the lives of the people we serve — offering cleaner, fuel efficient methods of cooking and hope for a better tomorrow.

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Join The Convoy / News

3 ways you can help Convoy of Hope empower women

Last week we saw incredible support for women on International Women’s Day. We at Convoy of Hope believe that when women are given strength and dignity, it not only impacts their families, but their entire communities as well. This is why we empower women each day to make strategic, independent life choices — and we want your help!

Women in developing countries often lack the education, opportunity and confidence to support themselves and their families. With your support, Convoy of Hope can help train women in necessary nutrition, health and everyday skills, and even help them to start their own business.

Here are 3 ways you can help empower women with Convoy of Hope:

1. Spread the word as an advocate

Being an advocate is one of the easiest ways to make an impact! Just by talking about the women who need support and raising awareness for their situation, you are supporting them. This can be as easy as telling a friend about the Women’s Empowerment program over coffee or sharing a woman’s story with a post on Facebook.

2. Throw a party

A Party2Empower is a party with a purpose! Gather your friends and neighbors to learn about some of the women who’s lives were changed through Women’s Empowerment, while enjoying activities themed from their stories. Not only is this a good way to spread the word, but it is a great opportunity to get your friends actively involved in this great cause. Learn more about throwing your own party to empower at convoy.org/women.

3. Donate

Whether its a one-time gift or a monthly commitment, your donation goes to significantly impact a woman’s life. A one-time gift of $25 would sponsor a girl in our Empowered Girls Program — helping her to attend weekly meetings where she would learn about topics like health, hygiene and harmful cultural practices, as well as helping her finish school and pursue job opportunities. A recurring monthly gift of $25 for a year would provide seed capital for a woman to start her own business. You can donate online at convoy.org/donate/IWD.

Learn more about how you can get involved with Convoy’s Women’s Empowerment program at convoy.org/women.

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Join The Convoy / Women's Empowerment

IDF fills hygiene kits for Convoy of Hope

On Thursday, February 22, associates at International Dehydrated Foods left their offices and came together to create more than 1,000 hygiene kits for Convoy of Hope.

IDF associates lined tables in a conference room and created their own assembly lines to fill bags with hygiene items like soap, toothpaste and washcloths. Their goal was to fill more than 1,000 bags in an hour, but managed to reach their goal in less than 30 minutes.

“We had so much participation,” Erin Danastasio, IDF Corporate Communication Manager said. “I mean almost everybody in the corporate office was able to come down and help out for the little bit. I’m exstatic. I’m so pleased with the outcome.”

The hygiene kits created will go to help disaster survivors in their time of crisis. Having hygiene kits like these ready before disaster strikes, means they can be given to survivors right away.

 
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Join The Convoy / Partner Spotlight / Volunteering