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Justin Thomas Plays for Hurricane Florence Survivors at PGA Tour Championship Justin Thomas Plays for Hurricane Florence Survivors at PGA Tour Championship

Justin Thomas to raise money for Convoy of Hope during PGA Tour Championship

Birdie 1 – Round 1 – Hole 6 = $1,000 Birdie 2 – Round 1 – Hole 10 = $1,000
Birdie 3 – Round 1 – Hole 11 = $1,000 Birdie 4 – Round 1 – Hole 12 = $1,000
Birdie 5 – Round 1 – Hole 15 = $1,000 Birdie 6 – Round 2 – Hole 2 = $1,000
Birdie 7 – Round 2 – Hole 4 = $1,000 Birdie 8 – Round 2 – Hole 6 = $1,000
Birdie 9 – Round 2 – Hole 15 = $1,000 Birdie 10 – Round 2 – Hole 18 = $1,000
Birdie 11 – Round 3 – Hole 6 = $1,000 Birdie 12 – Round 3 – Hole 10 = $1,000
Birdie 13 – Round 3 – Hole 13 = $1,000 Birdie 14 – Round 3 – Hole 17 = $1,000
Birdie 15 – Round 3 – Hole 18 = $1,000 Birdie 16 – Round 4 – Hole 2 = $1,000
Birdie 17 – Round 4 – Hole 8 = $1,000

TOTAL: $17,000

For the third year in a row, professional golfer and 2017 PGA TOUR player of the year, Justin Thomas will partner with Convoy of Hope to raise money for hurricane relief efforts. During the PGA Tour Championship, Justin has pledged to donate $1,000 for every birdie and $5,000 for every eagle he makes to Convoy of Hope’s Hurricane Florence disaster response.

Justin, his sponsors and fans generated more than $90,000 in donations over the past two year to help Convoy’s hurricane relief efforts. Justin is currently ranked 4th on the PGA’s Official World Golf Ranking and has had seven PGA Tour wins.

“We are thrilled Justin is partnering with Convoy again this year. His support makes a difference in the work we are doing to help the individuals and communities affected by Hurricane Florence” said Rick Waggoner, Convoy’s vice president of development.

Join Justin in bringing help and hope to those in need!

Donate to Hurricane Florence Response

Check back throughout the weekend to see how Justin is doing.

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Advocacy / Join the Convoy / News

Convoy of Hope receives 15th consecutive four-star rating from Charity Navigator

 

Here at Convoy of Hope, we take financial accountability and transparency very seriously. To that we end, we work tirelessly to ensure we meet and exceed the best practices of our industry. Every year since 2002, Convoy has received the highest possible rating from industry watchdog, Charity Navigator.

Currently, 90 percent of every dollar raised by Convoy of Hope goes directly to programming. The remaining 10 percent covers our administrative and fundraising costs. Convoy’s commitment to keeping our overhead low demonstrates our determination to efficiently deliver help and hope to people in need.

Convoy of Hope’s profile on Charity Navigator can be found here.

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Celebrating 100 million served

 

Since 1994, Convoy of Hope has never wavered in its passion to serve the poor and suffering around the world. Our goal has always been to serve those in need while maintaining their dignity and value — never to boost our numbers.

That said, crossing the 100 million served milestone is something to be celebrated! We are forever grateful to you, our ever-growing circle of supporters, for the commitment you have made to those in need of hope. From survivors of disasters, to children who receive a hot meal at school, to women and farmers who can now provide for their families, and hurting people around the United States … the relief you’ve made possible has touched more than 100 million lives.

The world is a more hopeful place because of you.

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Students’ partner with Convoy of Hope in rocket stove competition

Students from Missouri State and Evangel University took to the Evangel courtyard Wednesday, March 21, to take part in a rocket stove competition, in partnership with Convoy of Hope.

The Applied Sustainability class, taught by Evangel Professor and Convoy of Hope Senior Director of Program Effectiveness and Training Jason Streubel, is a course designed to engage students in analyzing and solving the world’s humanitarian needs.

A rocket stove is a fuel and heat efficient stove, that uses combustion and ventilation to produce heat while conserving fuel. Usually found in developing countries, the cost efficient stove produces almost no smoke and is a staple in areas with a low supply of fuel sources.

We have a winner

Students were required to build their rocket stove out of household or repurposed items. The goal was to get the stove to boil a pot of water for 10 minutes at 100 degrees Celsius — the time and temperature required to sanitize contaminated water.

Scott McElveen, a graduate student in Missouri States Agricultural Science program, completed the ten minute boil. His rocket stove, a combination of coffee cans and aluminum foil, held 100 degrees for 14 minutes.

“If you were in a foreign country, you could drink that water,” McElveen said smiling.

How Convoy uses rocket stove technology

Convoy of Hope works in developing countries around the world through Children’s Feeding, Women’s Empowerment and Agriculture initiatives. To improve the lives of people we serve, we are beginning to implement clean stove technology.

“How do you burn a stove while being fuel efficient and heat efficient?” Streubel said. “That’s what we are trying to find out.”

Right now, a manufactured rocket stove would cost someone in Kenya about two days wages. In countries like El Salvador and Nicaragua, rocket stove materials are limited to natural resources like stone, brick, clay and cob.

One Missouri State student, Cady Goble, used cob to build her rocket stove. Her cob mixture — a combination of clay, sand and prairie grass — is a variation of what most people use to build rocket stoves in our program countries. Like many of the people we serve, Goble understands the benefits to using natural resources.

“Anyone can make it using the resources around them,” Goble said. “It’s also scalable, it could be used for someone’s home.”

Along with creativity, cost, and heat efficiency, scalability is one of the benefits Streubel analyzed.

“We want to produce this in a way that is not just good for individuals, but in a way that could provide for whole families—or even schools,” Streubel said.

Streubel is analyzing the successes and failures of the classes’ models and using them to further his team’s knowledge of rocket stoves and how to manufacture them on a larger scale. With this additional information, Convoy of Hope can continue to implement clean stove technology in the lives of the people we serve — offering cleaner, fuel efficient methods of cooking and hope for a better tomorrow.

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Join the Convoy / News

Hurricane Maria response update from Puerto Rico

It’s been six months since Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, and many are still struggling to recover. Convoy of Hope has since served more five million meals to survivors across the island — in addition to hygiene products, water filters and other immediate relief supplies. Convoy continues to provide long-term recovery.

Rebuilding Hope

One of the more than 95 locations across Puerto Rico that Convoy has served in response to the hurricane is Villa Esparanza, which means Village of Hope. An estimated 175 homes, roughly 80% of the village, were damaged or destroyed. Currently Convoy is helping rebuild and repair homes around the village.

With the assistance of Convoy’s full time staff, the organization’s first Disaster Community Care Team spent last week helping the village with rebuilding projects and repairs.

For more updates on Convoy’s Hurricane Maria response, click here.

 

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Disaster Services / News