Browsing Category: Women’s Empowerment

Bread and the Battle For Empowerment: Murida’s Story

Murida’s husband left her to raise their four children on her own. Without a source of income, she lost her home, began living in the streets, and resorted to scavenging scraps of food from the trash to feed her family.

She felt hopeless. But then, she joined a Convoy of Hope Women’s Empowerment project in Ethiopia.

This program equips women with financial education, vocational training, cooperative saving groups, and start-up capital that is provided as a gift instead of a loan. Women engage in self-esteem-building activities and are provided with education in basic literacy and numeracy, family health and nutrition, family planning, and the prevention of communicable diseases.

Through Women’s Empowerment, every aspect of a woman’s life is addressed — from personal issues to small-business training. Convoy of Hope also provides ongoing support after a woman starts her business to ensure success.

“Every woman deserves to be empowered, to have strength and dignity, to know she is valuable,” Doree Donaldson, Vice President of Convoy:Women said. “Through this program, the lives of women and their families are being transformed and are receiving hope for a better future. I am excited to be a part of helping my sisters all over the world!” 

Murida was trained in how to cook and sell a local bread called njera. Convoy of Hope also provided her with supplies to start her own business. She worked hard, saved money, and built a house for her family. Her children are so proud of her.

“I feel like a human being now,” said Murida. “It’s like I’ve been reborn.”

Convoy of Hope is privileged to serve many single mothers like Murida. We celebrate with them as they provide a better life for their families.

Thank you for supporting Convoy of Hope as we provide hope to individuals around the world who now have a bright future ahead of them.

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Women's Empowerment

When the Odds Were Against Her, Margi Persevered

For many in Honduras, the struggle for hope is a part of daily living. Amidst regular droughts and hurricanes, Honduras is one of the poorest and most dangerous countries in Latin America, with approximately half of the population living below the poverty line.

Despite all of this, Margi still lives with hope. As a proactive and innovative entrepreneur, she participates in Convoy of Hope’s Women’s Empowerment program. This initiative helps people begin new lives with financial education, vocational training, cooperative saving groups, and start-up capital.

After opening a local grocery store, Margi began to see the cycle of hopelessness break in her life. Even when the pandemic struck, she and her store stood strong in the face of adversity.

“[The program] has been very helpful to me. I have learned to value myself, love myself, have self-confidence and realize that I am capable of achieving great things, which is why I have become an entrepreneurial woman,” Margi said. “Today I can see myself as a woman with clear goals and a vision of a life plan for the future.”

Thanks to her newfound confidence, stable source of income, and partnership with those who believe in her, she has persevered. As a light in her community, Margi has continued to thrive and encourage those around her.

Everything that one proposes in life can be achieved as long as we have the strength, attitude, and will to get ahead,” she said. To the people who make aid possible through Convoy, I say that they are doing an enormous job and I hope God blesses them so that they can continue supporting other people, just as they have done with me.”

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Women's Empowerment

Hope Starts Early: How Early Intervention Changed Zuri’s Story

“In my family, several people were left without work, so we had to find the means to bring food to our house,” Katherine said.

In many ways, the pandemic made life much more difficult for Katherine and her daughter, Zuri.

Less income meant more effort was required of Katherine to support her family. She and Zuri soon noticed an unintended consequence of their new normal. Since they were spending less time together, Zuri was missing out on a pivotal piece of her development as a young child.

Thanks to a visit from a friend, which then turned into a life-changing conversation, Katherine and Zuri began participating in Convoy of Hope’s Early Intervention program.

“I did not know that Convoy existed, but a sister came to my house and told me the work they do,” Katherine said. She went on to explain one of the most important things she has learned since enrolling in the program. “The way to help early intervention is that one should get involved with their children, dedicating more time to them, doing different exercises with them.”

Now, Katherine and Zuri spend time painting, drawing, and playing together. This ensures that Zuri has what she needs to learn and grow.

“I have never done something like this for her [before]. I read her stories at night and it is a special moment for both of us,” Katherine concluded. “We are very grateful.”

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Women's Empowerment

Convoy of Hope Helps Mother Throw First Birthday Party for 13-Year-Old

“It was the first time we’ve been able to celebrate a birthday,” Betelhem said proudly.

Behind her, decorations from her daughter’s 13th birthday celebration hung on the wall. To Betelhem and her family, the significance of those decorations stretch far beyond a single day; they mark an important milestone.

After joining Convoy of Hope’s Economic Empowerment program, Betelhem saw her life change dramatically. The program equipped her with financial education, vocational training, cooperative saving groups, and start-up capital.

At the start of the program, each woman engages in self-esteem building activities and is provided with education in basic literacy and numeracy, family health and nutrition, family planning, and the prevention of communicable diseases like HIV. After going through this training, women participate in income-generating activities as they launch their own small business. Convoy of Hope teams monitor their activity to provide support and ensure success.

Thanks in large part to the skills she learned through Convoy of Hope’s training, Betelhem started a laundry business in 2018. Now, she’s generating enough income to care for her six children and disabled sister, invest in her company, save, and celebrate more than ever before.

Thanks to your support, Convoy of Hope’s Economic Empowerment projects are helping mothers around the world provide for themselves and their families — affording them increased opportunities to celebrate life’s precious milestones with the dignity every person deserves.

For information about how you can be part of empowering women like Betelhem through Convoy:Women, click here.

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Women's Empowerment

Cultivating Vegetables & a Brighter Future

Rosa politely smiled as she showed her mother how to plant tomato seeds. The Honduran tween talked about the importance of the soil, how deep the holes for each seed should be, and how often they should be watered.

This skill is just one of the many that Rosa is learning in her Girls’ Empowerment group, a vital part of Convoy of Hope’s Women’s Empowerment initiative.

“I was very shy and insecure of myself. I did not think I could change,” she said. “But when I entered the club, I made many friends. I work better with people and now I am stronger. They have helped me with my personal development.”

The past year has been brutal for those living in Honduras. As the second-poorest country in Central America, the economic fallout that came during COVID-19 sent many of its residents deeper into poverty. Hurricanes Eta and Iota — both doing extensive damage across Central America — destroyed much of the country’s infrastructure. With so much fear and uncertainty, many are living without hope.

For Rosa, her Girls’ Empowerment group acts as a shelter from the storms of life. “My teacher talks to us a lot and gives us confidence to talk to her about things that make me feel insecure. The agriculture program has helped me to keep busier. It has benefited me and my family in eating healthy.”

Without Girls’ Empowerment, Rosa would be missing a vital link to community in a time where it’s needed most. Thank you for giving her the chance to thrive.

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Agriculture / Women's Empowerment