State: Florida

Daytona 500 & NASCAR Fans Go the Distance to Deliver Help

After the Daytona 500, NASCAR fans and other community members teamed up with Convoy of Hope to help serve the Daytona Beach area. Although the weather that day was dreary and unseasonably cold, the occasion was quite the opposite. 

The drive-thru distribution event provided groceries, socks, and other necessities to those affected by the pandemic or who found themselves in need of a little extra help and hope to get by. The NASCAR Foundation, Joey Logano Foundation, and Convoy Nation all worked together to make a difference in the community.

As a result of this event, more than 2,800 bags of groceries, 3,500 pairs of socks, and 120 cases of water were given out to more than 700 families. 

“Thank you so much for doing this,” Guest of Honor Eva Benitez said. She and her four children came to the event after she saw an Instagram post promising groceries and other necessities. Her husband, a construction worker, is the family’s sole provider but has been struggling to find consistent work. Thankfully, the Benitez family found the help that they needed at the event. “It helps. Thank you.”

“We are proud to host this food distribution event immediately following the Daytona 500,” Nichole Krieger, Executive Director of The NASCAR Foundation said. “We have been a proud partner alongside the Joey Logano Foundation and Convoy of Hope since the pandemic began to bring more than 180,000 pounds of food and supplies to 4,000 families in our racing communities in need. We couldn’t be happier to work with ONE DAYTONA and Daytona International Speedway to reach the local community right here in our hometown of Daytona Beach.”

“Convoy of Hope … has put a big shining light on a lot of people’s faces that need it right now. We just want to say thank you,” said Michael from the Joey Logano Foundation. “This has been an amazing event so far.” 

“Bringing something like this — where we can give back and give to our community, give to the folks that are here — really does go a long way to help,” Krieger concluded. “Thank you to Joey Logano Foundation and Convoy of Hope. This is the fifth time that we’ve done an event with them. They’re just great partners to work with and we’re thrilled to be able to do this.”

The event was an extension of Convoy Nation, one of our innovative initiatives. Convoy Nation works in the entertainment, entrepreneurial, and sports worlds to bring kindness and help to families who need it most.

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In the News

NFL Players Team Up with Convoy of Hope to Distribute Relief at Florida Event

Ever since Alecia Black lost her job as a result of the pandemic, she and her family have been struggling financially. Thankfully, Alecia was one of the many people who attended Convoy of Hope’s distribution event at Tropicana Field the day before Super Bowl LV.

“It has just been a true blessing. It floored me,” Alecia said of the event. “We truly, truly, truly appreciate it, from the bottom of our hearts. You definitely helped our family out.”

Convoy of Hope was able to provide more than 3,400 bags of groceries, 1,000 pairs of kids’ shoes, and 2,000 pairs of socks to families like Alecia’s. We also delivered additional resources to local organizations like Feeding Tampa Bay — furthering our impact. 

The event received support from several NFL familiars, such as Earl Christy, former Buccaneers player Michael Clayton, and Buccaneers punter Bradley Pinion’s spouse Kaeleigh, all of whom stepped in to volunteer.

“This weekend is obviously a big weekend for me and my family, with my husband playing in the Super Bowl tomorrow,” Kaeleigh shared. “But this has just been a really cool opportunity for me to bring some of my friends out here to partner with Convoy of Hope and to give back and really kind of flip the script about what’s important during Super Bowl weekend.”

The event was made possible by Convoy Nation, a group that allows individuals in the entertainment, entrepreneurial, and sports worlds to bring kindness and help to those in need. Convoy of Hope’s Chief Program Officer, Brad Rosenberg, also attended the event and served the St. Petersburg community first-hand.

“Even though the city was in the middle of a huge celebration, there were still many that were hurting and needed help,” he summarized. “They were so incredibly grateful for what Convoy of Hope was able to provide. We’re glad to be able to serve them.”

 

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Inspiration

Convoy of Hope’s trained volunteers are paving the way for a response to Dorian

After a close brush with Hurricane Irma, a group of passionate Floridians reached out to Convoy of Hope for help. Their community had been spared the brunt of the storm, but their drive to help survivors was galvanized. What they wanted from Convoy of Hope was not food or flood buckets. They wanted knowledge.

Within a short time, Convoy of Hope staff had trained 25 individuals in how to respond to local emergencies and disasters. Whether it was helping a neighbor when their house burned down or preparing for a major disaster like Hurricane Dorian, these individuals wanted to make sure that would be prepared should the worst happen.

At the training, Convoy of Hope staff instructed courses on disaster preparedness, assessing damage, relief distribution, and the cleanup processes. In addition to instruction about directly responding to disasters, attendees learned how to reach out to their local governments so they would be included in the master response plan for their area.

When it was announced that Florida would be directly in the path of Hurricane Dorian, members of this group of trained responders reached out to Convoy of Hope. On Saturday, a truck of supplies will be delivered to help resource first responders and to have immediate supplies for them to distribute to those affected by the storm.

Training a network of volunteers is a vital part of Convoy’s master plan of equipping local communities — not only with product and knowledge of our staff, but with the ability to care for their community when Convoy of Hope is not present.

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