State: Missouri

Founder’s Story

Hal, the oldest child at age 12, watched his mom frantically wrangle everyone into the car. After all, she knew it wasn’t ideal for the pastor and his wife to show up late to their own church business meeting. But just as they were peeling out of the neighborhood, they glimpsed the babysitter in the rearview mirror.

Deciding it would be better to show up late rather than with four rambunctious children, they turned around and let the kids pile out.

Later that night, there was a knock at the door. The babysitter answered to find two uniformed police officers with news: their parents’ car had been hit head-on by a drunk driver. Their dad was dead, and their mom was fighting for her life.

After months in the hospital, Hal’s mom returned home and starting work to support the family. The kids knew she worked as hard as she could, but the family still had to rely on food stamps and the generosity of others. In high school, Hal got a job pumping gas and changing tires to help support the family.

After graduation, he landed a job at Dow Chemical, where he worked while pursuing his degree in journalism. He wanted to succeed and develop his talents as a writer, so when an opportunity to write books opened up — fresh out of college — he jumped at the chance. He was determined to build a successful career and leave the poverty he had once known far behind. Each year he encountered new opportunities and became more and more preoccupied with a quest for personal success.

That is, until his travels brought him face to face with the homeless, starving, and destitute around the world.

A writing assignment eventually took him to Kolkata, India, where he was faced with what can only be described as the epitome of poverty and desperation. On his third trip to the city, he was taken to meet none other than Mother Teresa herself for an interview. Once face-to-face, she asked him one simple question: “Young man, what are you doing to help the poor and the suffering?”

Confronted with a question he was never prepared to answer, Hal paused. He couldn’t lie, but he hated the truth.

“I’m not doing much of anything,” he replied. Her response was even simpler than the question:  “Everyone can do something.”

No longer able to escape the guilt of sitting on his hands while the world suffered, he returned home to California, loaded a pickup truck with groceries and supplies, and distributed them to families in need.

That was the beginning of Convoy of Hope.  

Now, 25 years later, more than 100 million people have been served in more than 115 countries. Through community events, families are getting free haircuts, groceries, and family portraits. In the wake of disasters, communities are finding emergency relief and recovery support. Internationally, there are agriculture, women’s empowerment, and children’s feeding programs working to break cycles of poverty forever. Every effort centers around spreading one simple thing: hope.

Hal’s decision to pursue a life of generosity and kindness has grown into much more than an organization. It’s a movement that’s changing the world. It’s a movement of kindness that declares everyone can do something, and if we can do something, we must.

Caring for widows and orphans has never been optional. We have a mission. Convoy is just the vehicle — a way for all of us to link arms and do the next kind thing in front of us.

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25 Stories That Shaped Convoy of Hope

Convoy of Hope serves thousands at Puerto Rico community outreaches

Convoy of Hope put on community outreach events in five communities across Puerto Rico at the end of 2018. With the help of hundreds of volunteers, more than 2,000 guests were served in areas where Convoy has been active since Hurricane Maria struck in 2017.

Many Puerto Ricans have continued to struggle to put their lives back together after the hurricane. Stories of homelessness or a lack of running water or electricity were common as families received much needed resources.

In addition to free haircuts, health services, groceries, and more, guests commented on feelings of hope they wanted to carry with them long after the events were over. The kindness of those in their own communities and those across the world who support Convoy of Hope gave guests a renewed hope for the future.

Convoy of Hope plans to put on approximately 40 more Community Events in 2019. Learn more about these events and where they will be located at convoyofhope.org/events.

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Community Outreach

Smart giving options make your year-end donation easier

 

We hope you’re having a wonderful holiday season! We at Convoy of Hope are celebrating another year of helping others. Because of people like you, we’re fulfilling our mission to feed the world with food, hope and help through our many initiatives.

As a supporter of Convoy, here are a few “smart” ways you can continue partnering with us if you’re looking for end-of-year giving opportunities.

Round Up — Use this app to “round up” your purchases, donating a few cents each time you make a transaction. It might not seem like a lot … but your donation will go a long way, and we’re thankful for every penny!

Alexa — If you use any Alexa-enabled device, simply say, “Alexa, make a donation to Convoy of Hope,” and she will help you donate any amount using your Amazon Pay account.

Double your gift — From now until December 31, take advantage of our matching challenge! Every gift (up to $100,000 total) will be matched … doubling your impact. Make your gift now!

We hope this information has been helpful. Thank you for your support in 2018. Without you, we couldn’t do what we do.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

 

 

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Join the Convoy / News
This Giving Tuesday, share one day's wage to help those in need through Convoy of Hope! This Giving Tuesday, share one day's wage to help those in need through Convoy of Hope!

Maximize your impact with year-end giving

From the United States to the Philippines — and many places in between — Convoy of Hope’s Feed the World Fund supports our program activity around the world.

When you support our Feed the World Fund, your gift makes a 5:1 impact. This means that $20 creates $100 worth of impact; $100 creates $500 worth of impact; and $200 creates $1,000 in impact!

But, it gets even better. Up to $100,000 of gifts given to our Feed the World Fund between now and December 31 will be matched, dollar-for-dollar, to create twice the help for people in need. This means if you participate in our year-end match, your gift will be doubled — creating a 10:1 impact.

Gifts given to Convoy of Hope’s Feed the World Fund could help hungry kids in our Children’s Feeding program, transport groceries to a Community Event, give a farmer a chance to feed his family through our Agriculture initiative, help our Disaster Services team reach the heart of a disaster zone, lift a mother out of poverty through Women’s Empowerment or reach a small community through Rural Compassion.

We are grateful for your support every day, but especially during this season of thankfulness and generosity. Thank you for helping us make sure hope is not in short supply and that those in need are seen, helped and reminded that they are loved.

Click here to donate.

 

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Convoy of Hope and NBCF serve more than 70,000 women

Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in women, yet it is still one of the leading causes of cancer death among women. Convoy of Hope and National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF) have been working together for the past 6 years to educate and empower more than 70,000 women on breast health at Community Events!

As a woman enters the NBCF area of service, she will be greeted by a pink attired, specially trained member of the Kindness Crew. There she’ll receive information about breast health education, what breast cancer is and what kinds of questions she should ask her doctor.

From there she’ll learn how to perform a breast self-exam. These exams help alert women to possible concerns that should be brought to the attention of a health professional. Identifying concerns early increases the chances of successful treatment.

Before she leaves the area, we connect her with local resources and provide information on the closest low-cost or no-cost clinics in her area. It’s important that she knows where she can get help and support and that she leaves the NBCF area of service not only feeling cared for, but empowered to be proactive about her own health.

Learn more about Breast Cancer Awareness and the work of NBCF at nationalbreastcancer.org.

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Community Outreach / Partner Spotlight