Tag: Community Events

Hope comes to Watts

Just days before Convoy of Hope Los Angeles, very few believed it was actually going to happen. Residents of the Watts community have often been over promised and under delivered and skepticism ran rampant. Though in the face of adversity, hope came to Watts on December 2, 2017.

Hope arrives 

When the reality that this event was — in fact — going to happen hit, hope and excitement filled the community.

“I was driving down the street, on my way to Convoy and these big, monster Convoy of Hope trucks drove right by me,” said Julian Toriz, LA native and Kids Zone Leader for the event. “I’m like ‘oh my goodness!’ Rolling deep, 3 big trucks — boom, boom, boom. I got out my camera. I’m trying to drive and I’m like ‘I got to document this’.”

More than 8,400 Guests of Honor attended the event that day. They received free groceries, shoes, haircuts, and health services. The local team that worked with Convoy of Hope to make the event a reality was amazed at the impact on the community.

Overcoming challenges

The Watts neighborhood of South Central LA is an area of high poverty and crime. The 2010 census revealed that 35.9% of South Central LA live below the poverty line — more than double the U.S. rate of 14.1%. Watts is home to 13 known gangs and four of the largest housing projects in all of LA – all in a two square mile area.

A large step for the Convoy of Hope team in making this event a reality was meeting with and getting the approval of the Watts Gang Task Force to establish a Day of Peace. According to Convoy of Hope Signature Events Director Steve Pulis, not only did this create an opportunity for the community to attend the event without fear of violence, but it established the event as a positive opportunity to help the community.

“When that group came on board and got behind it, we had more than their permission,” Pulis said. “We got the word out among not only gangs, but the entire community – this event is positive, it’s here to help and the gangs are good with it. It has everyone’s support.”

The event took place in Ted Watkins Memorial Park. This is a special place to Convoy of Hope as it was the site of the first Community Event in 1995, only a few years before the park was closed due to violence at a few large park events. The park was closed to large events for 20 years, until the Convoy of Hope event in 2017.

A day of miracles

Convoy of Hope’s Community Events are only possible through the support of volunteers from within the community and its surrounding areas. For most Community Events, the Convoy of Hope team aims to get between 1,200 and 2,000 volunteers. However, by the day of the Watts event there were only 400 volunteers registered and only 303 actually came.

Even with the low volunteer attendance, the event ran smoothly and every Guest of Honor was able to be served.

“It’s a miracle that we didn’t have any issues,” Pulis said. “People can complain anywhere. You can get in too long of a line at the check out of any store and you’re gonna have someone upset. Nothing here.”

Local team member and long-time Watts resident Cornell Ward referenced the biblical story of The Feeding of the 5,000 — in which Jesus feeds 5,000 people with only five loaves of bread and two fish — and said “I know what it feels like.”

Hope continues

Convoy of Hope is grateful for the opportunity to bring some hope to South Central LA, but the work is not done yet. Convoy of Hope has already planned to return to LA for another Community Event on December 1, 2018.

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Community Outreach / Field Story / Volunteering

Bradley Pinion Nominated for 2017 Walter Payton Man of the Year Award

Friend of Convoy of Hope, Bradley Pinion, has been named the San Francisco 49ers nominee for the 2017 Walter Payton Man of the Year Award. Along with the award, United Way Worldwide, the National Football League Foundation and Nationwide are donating $50,000 to the charity of choice for each team’s nominee. Pinon has chosen Convoy of Hope as his recipient for the donation.

As part of the award celebration, each nominee is participating in a social media charity challenge. The nominee whose competition hashtag is used the most will receive an extra $25,000 for their charity. To help Pinion raise an extra $25,000 for Convoy of Hope, use the hashtag #WPMOYChallengePinion.

Pinion has been a great supporter of Convoy of Hope this year. He acted as an advocate for our disaster relief work during the especially active 2017 Atlantic hurricane season. He also recently represented Convoy of Hope on his cleats in celebration of the My Cause, My Cleats weekend. We’re also excited to, once again, have Pinon help us serve Bay Area Guests of Honor this week at our Community Event with the 49ers at Levi’s Stadium.

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Advocacy / Community Outreach / Inspiration / Join The Convoy / Program Updates

Hope for Families in San Antonio

“We hit the jackpot!” exclaims Sarah and Dre Valdez’s youngest son as he triumphantly holds two grocery bags loaded with food. He’s only seven, but even he understands the importance of what took place for his family — and thousands of others — at the San Antonio Community Event.

Like many people who attend Convoy’s Community Events, times have been tough for the Valdez family. Both Sarah and Dre recently lost their jobs and have been unable to find work. The free goods and services they received gave them a hand up during a difficult season in their life.

“You forget yourself and your burdens for a while,” says their mom, Sarah. “It was a blessing to come to Convoy of Hope and get things we needed.”

With smiles as wide as the Alamodome, the family of six poses for a photo. Afterward, they collect the new shoes and bags of groceries they received at the event and step into their futures with a renewed sense of hope.

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Community Outreach

2016 Community Events season kicks off

2016 will be Convoy of Hope’s 22nd year of serving tens of thousands of Guests of Honor at Community Events where we provide groceries, shoes, haircuts, family portraits, health exams, career services and much more.

At 28 Community Events across the United States last year, 23,000 volunteers served more than 82,000 guests.

“We had no idea of all that we would receive here, the love that we would feel,” says Mary, an honored guest at our Beckley, West Virginia, event. “Today we found hope.”

Mary was one of several unemployed guests at the event. Many families who attend our events are considered America’s working poor — the underemployed. Such families don’t often receive social benefits because they’re not unemployed, but still don’t make enough money to provide everything their family needs.

Community Events are designed to help those who need a hand up to get by.

“[It’s] not just about giving out free stuff,” says David Moore, city alderman of Chicago, where 10,000 guests attended last year’s event. “This [event] was about giving people hope to press on another day, another month and another year.”

Steve Pulis, signature events director for Convoy of Hope, concurs.

“Many people want their neighborhoods to change for the better,” he says. “They want peace rather than violence and crime. We’re here to restore a sense of hope by helping out with a few of life’s necessities.”

Pulis says those necessities are sometimes enough to change the future for families struggling to make ends meet.

“It’s unbelievable how many guests tell us they couldn’t afford shoes for their kids,” he says. “Because of our supporters, we get to be a part of helping families make it through another week.”

Already, 17 events are scheduled for the 2016 season. For the complete schedule, visit convoyofhope.org/events.

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Community Outreach / Join The Convoy / Program Updates