Tag: Hal Donaldson

Meandering from one viewpoint to the next, my young family of five sought out the sun’s warm rays on a brittle cold morning while we stared at the wondrous site that is a Grand Canyon sunrise. The Grand Canyon was one stop on our trek from California to Springfield, Mo., where I would get back to work and start the new year at Convoy of Hope’s offices. As we exited the National Park’s gates I asked my four-year-old how the Grand Canyon got there. With confidence she replied, “Rain, rain and that river made it Dad.”

My daughter’s response brings to mind another story of small beginnings. Convoy of Hope’s co-founder and CEO, Hal Donaldson, recently spoke to Missouri lawmakers at the 2014 Missouri Governor’s Prayer Breakfast. He told them about the 1969 car accident that took his father’s life and left his Mother badly injured and unable to work. He also told them about the Davis family who took he and his siblings into their single-wide trailer from day one and cared for them for months after. Hal went on to explain, “because of their investment in the lives of four children, God was able to take my father’s mangled automobile and he would transform it into a fleet of Convoy of Hope semi-trucks that are filled with food and supplies that today are crisscrossing our country, helping millions of people across our nation.” Then, in closing, he made the statement pictured above.

If the kindness of one family has sparked help and hope for more than 63 million people in Convoy of Hope’s 20 years. And, if my daughter is right about rain drops making the Grand Canyon. Then, imagine the wondrous site we’d all be staring at one year from now if we dedicated 2014 to kindness. Whether it’s helping people in their hardest moments or chipping away at a hardened society with drips and drops of random kindness, our small actions can completely alter the landscape of our world.

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Inspiration

Hal Donaldson urges politicians to practice a year of kindness

In the video above, our co-founder and CEO delivers his speech to Missouri Lawmakers at the recent 2014 Governor’s Prayer Breakfast.

The following is an excerpt from a story at News-Leader.com by Jonathan Shorman. 

Convoy of Hope founder Hal Donaldson this morning urged a gathering of Missouri’s most powerful to practice a year of kindness.

Donaldson, president of the Springfield-based charity, gave the keynote address at the annual Governor’s Prayer Breakfast, a bipartisan event attended by hundreds of people and top names in Missouri leadership.

“If we will collectively dedicate ourselves to a lifestyle of kindness and compassion, 2014 can be a defining moment for our state and our nation, and in turn many of the problems that we face — those problems will begin to fade,” Donaldson said. “Friend, a year of kindness and compassion can absolutely change everything.”

Donaldson recounted how, as a child in 1969, his father had been killed by a drunk driver and mother seriously injured. The family who took him in for several months afterward changed his life forever. Donaldson said without their kindness, Convoy of Hope would never have happened.

Read the full story at News-Leader.com

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From the Founders / In the News / News

Mother Teresa is a global household name for her humanitarian work in India, for speaking candidly to world leaders about caring for the vulnerable and for founding Missionaries of Charity, 4,500 sisters dedicated to serving the poor in 133 countries. Yet, with all of her international fame and impact, she remained focussed on the person in front of her.

Prior to founding Convoy of hope, our president Hal Donaldson got to meet Mother Teresa in Calcutta. There she challenged Hal to do his part to help the people around him . “Everyone can do something,” she told him. Years later Convoy of Hope is helping millions of people around the world each year.

Today we’re challenged by Mother Teresa to look to the left, to the right and across the street to know, serve and love our next door neighbors.

Have you gone out of your way to get to know your neighbor? How has it impacted you?

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Inspiration

Hurricane Sandy: Yesterday’s News?

Five months after Hurricane Sandy, I toured devastated neighborhoods and talked to survivors. They were thankful for the work of Convoy of Hope and other organizations, but they couldn’t understand why the crisis disappeared from newscasts and newspapers so quickly — when thousands of families are still homeless.

From the street, many homes appear as though they escaped the storm with minimal damage. But upon further inspection, flooding has destroyed foundations, flooring and walls. With tears in their eyes, one homeowner after another told how they had lost all their possessions — and, because they were underinsured, now had nowhere to turn. The reality that many will never return to their homes is setting in.

Many victims are living in hotels or with family members. Children have been uprooted from their schools, and parents have lost their jobs as businesses try to recover.

But, amid the crisis, there are also stories of big-hearted churches and businesses that turned their facilities into warehouses and dormitories.

Because of the generosity of friends like you — and corporate donations of food and supplies — Convoy of Hope established a warehouse in the region to meet ongoing needs. Together we delivered 80 semi-truck loads of food, water and supplies following the disaster.

Thank you for giving hope to victims you will likely never meet — but whose needs are very real. Although the news media has moved on to other stories, it cannot be “yesterday’s news.”

God bless you.

Hal Donaldson, President and Co-Founder of Convoy of Hope 

Follow @haldonaldson on Twitter

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From the Founders