Tag: Kindness Changes Everything

Super Bowl Champion Bradley Pinion Partners With Convoy of Hope for Community Event

Super Bowl champion Bradley Pinion teamed up with Convoy of Hope to host a Pro-Series Community Event in Clemson, South Carolina. The event featured free groceries, shoes, socks, haircuts, hygiene kits, hot meals, and NFL-style skills and drills for Guests of Honor to enjoy. 

“I’ve been partnering with Convoy of Hope since my rookie year and am so thankful that I can bring the Convoy Nation Pro-Series Community Event to the Clemson community — where I played college football,” Bradley said. “Any family who needs some help is welcome.”

The event helped meet immediate needs of those in the Clemson community. More than 600 people received help and hope that day.

“Oh mama, look at these shoes!” one child said, beaming with joy. “I’m going to run so fast now!”

Partnerships like Bradley Pinion’s help Convoy of Hope serve communities all around the world.

“Bradley has played a pivotal role in bringing Convoy of Hope to communities throughout his NFL career,” said Kirk Noonan, Vice President of Convoy Nation, a fan base of kindness with Convoy of Hope. “We are thankful for such a friend who is determined to give families help and hope.”

Thank you to our partners and supporters who make events like this possible.

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Community Events / In the News / Partner Spotlight

Convoy of Hope helps provide life-giving water in Kenya

Water is life. But many people around the world don’t have access to clean drinking water. In fact, an estimated 800 million people worldwide lack an adequate water supply. 

Convoy of Hope is passionate about getting water to those whose lives depend on it. Convoy’s work in Kenya is a prime example. Through a long-term relationship with Kenya National Director Bryan Burr, hundreds of thousands of Kenyans have better access to clean water.

“For many of the people we work with, water is not easily accessible,” said Bryan. “They walk long distances to fetch water daily, and this consumes large amounts of their time.” 

Bryan is committed to being a part of the solution. They have lived and worked in Kenya since 1997, and their partnership with Convoy of Hope goes back nearly as long. They’ve been instrumental in helping Convoy drill boreholes, which are similar to wells, that can hold millions of gallons of water. Bryan and his team have two months to capitalize on rainfall: April and October. Collecting rainwater is key to survival for the rest of the year.

“Having water available helps them not only take care of basic needs, but also gives them time to engage in agriculture and other income generating initiatives,” Bryan said.

In addition to the boreholes, Convoy has worked with local, established churches to put up greenhouses in many communities. This helps show Kenyans that they don’t only have to be reliant on cattle for food and they can depend on other sustainable food sources.

“I feel safe saying it’s hundreds of thousands of people impacted,” Bryan said. “The wells we’ve been able to put in, greenhouses, and the dams to help store up water — they are changing lives. Many come to access that water.”

Many members of the Maasai tribe in Kenya rely solely on cattle for food. However, because of very little rainfall, they have to keep their herd sizes small. Thankfully, the quality of the herds’ health is improving through rain collection. Of course, the land is benefiting, too.

“There used to be no grass, no weeds even. And two and a half years later, the ground cover has increased significantly because of the water. Now it’s bushy!” Bryan said. “We are seeing the land restored.”

Like water, hope changes shape from time to time. Both are vital. For people affected by the water crises in Kenya, hope comes in the form of a sustainable water source and is provided as a direct result of support from people like you.

Convoy of Hope will continue to provide help and hope to people in need. To join us in our mission, click here.

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Water

Clean Water & Pervasive Hope Flow Freely in El Salvador

Health, hope, and safe drinking water are closely linked. That’s why Convoy of Hope has partnered with companies like LifeStraw to provide help to people without a source to clean water.

After Tropical Storm Amanda struck El Salvador in June of 2020, many communities watched flood waters rise and limit their access to clean drinking water. Everyone affected by the storm found themselves at much greater risk for water-borne illnesses.

To address this need, LifeStraw donated LifeStraw Community units for our team in El Salvador to distribute to those affected by water insecurity. Many of the communities who received filtration units lived with an ever-present fear of parasitic infections and kidney failure.

The LifeStraw Community units are designed to remove 99.99% of bacteria, viruses, and protozoan parasites by filtering 25 liters of water at a time. The units use gravity filtration to mitigate the need for running water or an external power source and can safely filter enough water for 100 people a day for up to five years.

When communities receive hope like this, they have more than just their immediate needs met. One community continued to spread hope by sharing clean water with others who were still in need.

Water is a daily necessity that sustains in the present; hope is a necessity for a brighter future. Together, they are life-changing. Thanks to our partners and supporters, Convoy of Hope has been changing the stories of people who lack access to water and new opportunities.

To learn more about World Water Day and what water means to communities around the world, click here. For more information about LifeStraw, click here.

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Disaster Services / Partner Spotlight

Cultivating Vegetables & a Brighter Future

Rosa politely smiled as she showed her mother how to plant tomato seeds. The Honduran tween talked about the importance of the soil, how deep the holes for each seed should be, and how often they should be watered.

This skill is just one of the many that Rosa is learning in her Girls’ Empowerment group, a vital part of Convoy of Hope’s Women’s Empowerment initiative.

“I was very shy and insecure of myself. I did not think I could change,” she said. “But when I entered the club, I made many friends. I work better with people and now I am stronger. They have helped me with my personal development.”

The past year has been brutal for those living in Honduras. As the second-poorest country in Central America, the economic fallout that came during COVID-19 sent many of its residents deeper into poverty. Hurricanes Eta and Iota — both doing extensive damage across Central America — destroyed much of the country’s infrastructure. With so much fear and uncertainty, many are living without hope.

For Rosa, her Girls’ Empowerment group acts as a shelter from the storms of life. “My teacher talks to us a lot and gives us confidence to talk to her about things that make me feel insecure. The agriculture program has helped me to keep busier. It has benefited me and my family in eating healthy.”

Without Girls’ Empowerment, Rosa would be missing a vital link to community in a time where it’s needed most. Thank you for giving her the chance to thrive.

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Agriculture / Women's Empowerment

Storm After Storm, Hope Remains

“The wind was terrible,” Christian said with a somber look on his face. “As the storm grew stronger and stronger … me and my wife were both holding the French doors shut.”

No sooner had survivors like Christian begun assessing the damage Hurricane Laura caused than Convoy of Hope sprang into action. Hurricane Laura was one of 26 disasters in the U.S. that Convoy of Hope responded to in 2020. Additionally, we responded to 36 disasters overseas, serving more than 1 million people internationally and more than 4.5 million people domestically.

Christian and his wife were trapped in their home when Hurricane Laura struck. Back in 2005, Christian and his family found themselves in a similar situation. Hurricane Rita decimated the Lake Charles area of Louisiana, leaving many without food, water, shelter, or other necessities. It was then that Christian had his first experience with Convoy of Hope.

“Convoy of Hope helped us tremendously. They were our lifeline for three weeks,” he said.

After Hurricane Laura dissipated, more than 450 volunteers distributed close to 1.6 million pounds of resources to people in need. In order to give back after his experience in 2005, Christian decided to become a volunteer with Convoy of Hope.

“As we give food, as we give water, people receive the help, I think it gives a little hope,” Christian said.

Because of volunteers like Christian and supporters around the world, Convoy of Hope served nearly 60,000 individuals across 16 cities in Louisiana. Thank you for helping us provide hope in every storm.

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Disaster Services / Field Story