Tag: National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Convoy of Hope and NBCF serve more than 70,000 women

Breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in women, yet it is still one of the leading causes of cancer death among women. Convoy of Hope and National Breast Cancer Foundation (NBCF) have been working together for the past 6 years to educate and empower more than 70,000 women on breast health at Community Events!

As a woman enters the NBCF area of service, she will be greeted by a pink attired, specially trained member of the Kindness Crew. There she’ll receive information about breast health education, what breast cancer is and what kinds of questions she should ask her doctor.

From there she’ll learn how to perform a breast self-exam. These exams help alert women to possible concerns that should be brought to the attention of a health professional. Identifying concerns early increases the chances of successful treatment.

Before she leaves the area, we connect her with local resources and provide information on the closest low-cost or no-cost clinics in her area. It’s important that she knows where she can get help and support and that she leaves the NBCF area of service not only feeling cared for, but empowered to be proactive about her own health.

Learn more about Breast Cancer Awareness and the work of NBCF at nationalbreastcancer.org.

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Community Outreach / Partner Spotlight

Breast Cancer Awareness Month With Convoy of Hope

Have you ever wondered what happens inside the National Breast Cancer Foundation tent at a Convoy of Hope event? It’s a fair question since what we give out is harder to quantify than the groceries, shoes or haircuts that some of the other partnering organizations provide. What are we giving out you ask? With the help of our volunteers, we are providing vital breast health educational resources, but ultimately we are providing empowerment. We want every woman who comes through our tent to leave knowing how to be more proactive about her breast health.

One of the gifts we distribute in the tent is a booklet that helps recipients learn how to become more aware of their own breast health. It also includes questions women should ask of themselves and their doctors in order to take a more active role in assessing their personal risk factors. We don’t just pass this booklet out and send guests away, however. Trained volunteers review it with each guest, emphasizing its importance, and connecting them with local resources if they need access to screenings.

The information in this booklet is so valuable that we believe everyone should have access to it. That’s why this October, in honor of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, NBCF is offering our new eBook, What Every Woman Needs to Know, as a free download to anyone who requests it. This book is filled with much of the same great information we provide to Convoy guests in a printed format. Request your free copy today!

We’d be remiss if we didn’t take this opportunity to thank all the volunteers who make our Convoy tent experience such a warm, welcoming and enriching experience for the guests we serve. Thank you for joining in our mission of Helping Women Now®! We couldn’t do it without you!

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Community Outreach / Partner Spotlight
Lisa beams as she stands outside the NBCF tent in Chicago. Lisa beams as she stands outside the NBCF tent in Chicago.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Saving Moms and Daughters

Lisa, a 51-year-old breast cancer survivor wearing a brightly colored “Breast Cancer Survivor” t-shirt, beams as she is greeted at the National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc.® tent by representatives and volunteers. Her smile is one of resilience, determination and gratitude — all honed over her battle with cancer.

“It was devastating,” says Lisa of her diagnosis in 2011. “I was in a state of shock.”

Lisa relied on her friends, family and support groups to get her through the difficult times. She started chemotherapy and radiation and in late 2012 received the best news she could receive — she was cancer-free.

When asked how it felt when she heard those words come from her doctor, Lisa took a deep breath then slowly exhaled. Her body seemed to slip into a peaceful stance. “Joy,” she said as her eyes filled with tears.

Later in the day, more tears fell under the NBCF tent — but this time from a volunteer. Stacey, age 46, was decked out in all her breast cancer awareness accessories as a way to honor her late mother, who lost her battle with breast cancer in 2010.

“I hope she’s proud of me,” Stacey says of her mother, noting that the NBCF tent is important for women because of the early detection education and support services they offer. Throughout the day, Stacey could be heard encouraging other women to be aware and know their bodies so that they can take control of their health — a key talking point passed onto each woman who comes through the tent.

“It means a lot to me that these resources exist,” says Stacey of the education and services offered by NBCF. “Being aware saves mothers and daughters, and if I can help one person with my story — it’s worth it.”

For more information, visit nbcf.org.

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Community Outreach / Inspiration / Partner Spotlight
Shannon volunteered in the National Breast Cancer Foundation tent at our recent community event in Sioux City, IA. Shannon volunteered in the National Breast Cancer Foundation tent at our recent community event in Sioux City, IA.

Hello, my name is Shannon

Next month is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Shannon—a volunteer at our recent Sioux City, Iowa community event—has gotten us off to a head start. After volunteering in the National Breast Cancer Foundation tent all day, she left us this note.

“Hello, my name is Shannon, I’m 19 years old and I attend nursing school in Iowa. Today while volunteering I told people the importance of early screening for breast cancer. The reason I came today was [because] I was want to make a difference in peoples lives, and telling them about preventative measures for breast cancer could potentially save their life.

I know from experience the importance of catching breast cancer at an early stage. My Aunt and Grandma both are breast cancer survivors. Just telling someone to get their yearly mammograms is important.

I would like to volunteer to inform people about breast cancer and how life-threatening it can be. Also, I want to fundraise at my college to help the National Breast Cancer Foundation through Convoy of Hope. Reaching out to others about breast cancer awareness is my ultimate goal … and to spread the word about Convoy of Hope.”

Wow! Shannon gets it, doesn’t she? We’re grateful for incredible volunteers like Shannon, who come ready to serve, then leave changed and ready to serve more!

Have you been to one of our community events? What was your experience?

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Community Outreach / Program Updates