Tag: Refugees

World Refugee Day

As conflict and famine develop in a country, a new normal arises — violence escalates, crops and herds are destroyed and women and children are at the mercy of traffickers — forcing families to move, leaving everything they’ve known behind. Convoy of Hope steps in to offer these refugee families hope through education, emotional support, food, clothing and other important relief necessities.

Hope in Lebanon

In Lebanon, Convoy of Hope currently feeds more than a 1,000 refugee children in urban areas and encampments. Mehar and her family, who escaped to Lebanon from Syria, were often forced to beg for food from their neighbors. Now she receives a meal every school day through Convoy’s nutrition program, relieving financial pressures on her family and encouraging her continued education.

We also restore livelihoods through Women’s Empowerment programming, helping mothers to start their own businesses for a source of income. Doing so allows their children to attend school rather than having to earn money to supplement household expenses.

Hope in Uganda

In Uganda, Convoy of Hope has stepped in with programs reconciling women to their dignity by restoring access to food and clean water, hygiene kits and trauma care. Rose is one of more than 1 million South Sudanese refugees currently in Uganda. She struggled with chronic malnutrition, but after participating in Convoy’s nutrition program for pregnant and lactating women, her health has improved. Along with a therapeutic food supplement, she received training in nutrition, hygiene, and gardening. Rose cites the lack of information as a main reason why so many women are malnourished.

Hope in the Middle East and Europe

In the Middle East and Europe, Convoy of Hope is assessing a priority of needs among refugees and internally displaced families as conflicts escalate. In 2017, Convoy was able to serve thousands of displaced people in areas like Afghanistan, Jordan, Spain and Moldova through relief items like clothing, hygiene kits and winter weather kits.

We applaud the resilience of refugee women and children who, with your help, are re-stabilizing their households, redeeming their childhoods and resuming their lives from within their new normal. On this World Refugee Day, join us in supporting displaced families around the world at convoy.org/refugees.

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Advocacy / Children's Feeding

Replace Fear with Kindness on World Refugee Day

A few short weeks ago, I visited the home of a single mother to three boys. She sat quietly next to me and we tried to nonverbally communicate through a series of smiles, nervous laughter and gestures. She reminded me of other mothers; strong, caring and loving. The difference between this mother and other mothers I know is that she led her children out of Syria to safety in Lebanon after her husband was killed. Her children have witnessed war, death and destruction, but life must go on for this family. With no home to call their own; they are stateless.

They are refugees.

My new friend and her family join 65.3 million other individuals who have been displaced from their homes due to war, conflict or climate change. Nearly 1 in every 100 persons around the world are displaced from their homes and, on average, people remain displaced from their homes for 17 years. For my friend, this means she must plan a new future for her children: one that will occur outside the comfort of her own home.

Today, and everyday, we celebrate my new friend and the millions of other refugees around the world who are learning new languages, navigating differences in cultures and dreaming new futures for their children. We lift up their courage and strength, and trade fear for kindness.

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In the News

World Refugee Day

Wars, conflict and persecution have forced more people to flee their homes and seek refuge and safety elsewhere than at any other time in recorded history. Today, there are 65 million refugees, more than half of whom are children. It is the greatest humanitarian crisis since WWII — and it will be the crisis that defines my generation.

Refugees are afraid, desperate, and often have nowhere to go. They’ve narrowly escaped the bombs and bullets, just to be slowly tormented on the inside by the humiliation of being chased away like criminals. Refugees are lost: physically, emotionally and spiritually.

Since the start of the crisis, Convoy of Hope has been able to help nearly 80,000 refugees with life-saving food rations, warm blankets and a message of hope in the Middle East and all along the route that refugees take to reach a safe haven. We are currently implementing an emergency-based Children’s Feeding Initiative for 350 hungry refugee children in Lebanon. This means these children can now attend school without worrying about having to try and earn a bit of money just so they can eat that day.  This might be the first time some have ever attended school. Many families have been in these refugee camps since the start of Syria’s civil war in 2011, causing this group of children to be called “the lost generation.”

Today, we celebrate the courage and strength of the 65 million displaced people around the world; it inspires us to work hard for the 30 million children who deserve their childhood.

You can help support Convoy of Hope.
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Children's Feeding / In the News / Program Updates

I Am Syria

“I am Syria” is a powerful statement, especially coming from elementary school students in Charlotte, North Carolina. But that’s what the kids at the school wanted to do — make a statement.

Fourth and fifth graders at Nathaniel Alexander Elementary studied the refugee crisis and decided they wanted to do something to help kids who seemed just like them, but are facing the despair of living inside a humanitarian crisis.

“We try to focus on how we can do good for others,” says Nicole Nederlk, a teacher at the school. “It’s important for the kids to know what they’re giving towards.”

The kids raised money and wore green on a designated day to show their support. More than $500 was donated for Convoy of Hope’s response in the Middle East and Europe.

“I used to only care about myself,” says Danaiyah, a student at Nathaniel Alexander. “But now I know the importance of helping others.”

Jamie Waldron, outreach director for Elevation Church, helps out at the school in the food pantry and coordinates events. She recently visited Convoy’s work in Lebanon, so Jamie encouraged the kids to give the money they raised to Convoy of Hope. She showed them a video of the kids they would be helping.

“Some of the kids at Nathaniel Alexander don’t have much,” Waldron says. “But when they saw kids [on the video] that couldn’t go to school or didn’t have beds at all, they were moved to help.”

We’re thankful for children who are practicing compassion at such a young age. Because of them, we are able to bring hope and help to refugee children around the world.

 

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Advocacy / Inspiration / Join the Convoy

COHEU Continues to Aid Refugees

Convoy of Hope Europe (COHEU) continues to respond to the refugee crisis in the Middle East and Europe. However, they are concentrating most of their efforts on the camp that has been set up in Calais, France, known as The Jungle.
This week, teams from Holland, Belgium and France will assist with the first ever Christmas outreach there. The program will consist of music, a general food distribution and gift boxes for the kids.

All of the refugees that live in the compound around the area have had their flimsy tents replaced by stronger, but basic wooden structures built by volunteers from the local church.

About 30 miles away, in the city of Dunkirk, there is another camp that hosts 1,800 refugees. COHEU will distribute Christmas gifts to the kids there and will take this camp on as a new project.
Because the refugees are using all types of improvised ways to cook their food and keep warm, COHEU is asking for help to buy more rain ponchos and stoves, as they continue to take significant strides to reach as many Syrian refugees as possible.
For more information, please visit convoyofhope.eu.
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Partner Spotlight / Program Updates