Tag: Tanzania

Don’t be Chai

In a dusty village near the border of Tanzania and Kenya, government workers and ruby miners start their busy day. The bustling market comes alive with traders and local people, and Adimu works diligently to prepare her restaurant for the day’s rush. Each utensil finds its home in an assigned cupboard or drawer. Her new chairs and tile floors offer a welcoming glow as the sun pours through the restaurant’s long yellow curtains.

It hasn’t always been this way for Adimu. Not long ago, she was selling tomatoes at her local market and making less than $1 a day. She and her children lived in a different community, and she struggled to provide for them. When Adimu’s daughter received a partial scholarship to attend primary school in a different district, Adimu knew she had to make it work.

Shortly after moving, Anna got involved in Convoy of Hope’s Women’s Empowerment program. After completing her training, she was given the opportunity to run her own restaurant. Every day, she works hard preparing meals and chai for the customers at her restaurant while her children attend school. Now that Adimu has a steady income, she can afford to feed her children three times a day and pay for their schooling.

“I am amazed at the favor I have in this community,” she says.

As the sun continues to scorch the earth during the relentless dry season, women begin to line up outside Adimu’s restaurant. Before, this group struggled for hours every day to find clean water. Now they fill their cans and water bottles with the water rushing from the faucet outside of Adimu’s business.

As other women in her Tanzanian community continue to search for the chance at a better life, Adimu’s restaurant stands as a reminder — hope is never far away.
COMMENT
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Pinterest
Women's Empowerment

Field Teams: Hope for a Sustainable Future

Convoy of Hope Field Teams come alongside communities and engage in work that helps them flourish. Teams from all over the U.S. work with the staff in several countries around the world to tackle projects that support Convoy’s various programs. These opportunities give volunteers the chance to offer hope and help in ways that not only affect the lives of one child or family, but the long-term trajectory of an entire community.

Since we began our Field Teams program in 2013, we’ve engaged more than 4,600 volunteers. These teams help in places like the Ngaramtoni Primary School in Tanzania, where teams serve kids who are in our Children’s Feeding program. 

According to Jackie Brawner, a Field Team volunteer leader who worked in this area of Tanzania, teams began working with the school by offering kids lunch every day and helping clear brush so they could build greenhouses. Jackie’s church, Bonita Valley Community Church, even funded two greenhouses for the school to grow their own food for lunch. The school can now sell any extra food they grow at the market to purchase other foods as well, which diversifies their students’ diets. 

With the help of Field Teams, we hope that one day this community will be thriving without need of our help. 

“I love that Convoy of Hope is focused on sustainability,” Jackie says. “We are able, as a team, to go into the places where Convoy of Hope is working and continue the work. And when we leave, because of the established programs they have there, the projects will be continued.” 

Since Convoy entered Ngaramtoni, we’ve held community meetings, helped identify income generating opportunities, addressed hygiene and sanitation issues, empowered mothers to do business, and taught students gardening techniques. The school is now poised to harvest and sell more than 10 metric tons of tomatoes per year, which will fund the lunch program in the future.

“Working with Convoy of Hope Field Teams is the greatest blessing of my life,” says Jackie. “To be boots on the ground and to see the work and effort that Convoy of Hope is doing to feed people and change lives is a priceless experience. On a Field Team, there will be guaranteed laughter and tears. You cannot come back the same. They are truly trips of a lifetime.” 

Already in 2019, 46 Field Teams have served in 10 different locations, from Moldova to the Mississippi Delta. These incredible volunteers have helped with numerous projects around the world in support of our mission — providing help and hope to people who need it most. 

Visit convoyofhope.org/fieldteams to learn more about Field Teams.

 

COMMENT
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Pinterest
25 Stories That Shaped Convoy of Hope / Agriculture / Children's Feeding / Field Story / Join the Convoy / Volunteering
Head teacher Twati Mollel shows organic tomatoes growing in a greenhouse at his school near Arusha, Tanzania. Profit from the produce will feed students for years to come Head teacher Twati Mollel shows organic tomatoes growing in a greenhouse at his school near Arusha, Tanzania. Profit from the produce will feed students for years to come

10 tons of tomatoes grown in Tanzania increase sustainability

 

As the Tanzanian government increases its requirements for nonprofits, Convoy of Hope’s method of capacity building through nutrition programs has emerged as a leading model

For three days in December, high-ranking officials came from three government ministries to inspect Convoy of Hope’s programs. The delegation visited Ngaramtoni Primary School near Arusha, where Convoy has a feeding program.

What impressed the officials was the execution of Convoy’s plan in equipping the school to become self-sustaining, which enables the organization to move on and do the same with other schools.

Since Convoy entered Ngaramtoni in 2014, they’ve held community meetings, helped identify income-generating opportunities, addressed hygiene and sanitation issues, empowered mothers to do business and taught students gardening techniques. The school is now poised to harvest and sell more than 10 metric tons of tomatoes per year, which will fund the lunch program in the future.

The officials asked Convoy of Hope to expand into other schools, and they marveled at how the organization invests in building capacity in the community.
“Where have you been all along!?” exclaimed one government official.

In fact, Convoy has received accolades from district government in recent years, and its development work has been featured on the evening news. Recognition from the national government, however, is new.

Convoy of Hope leadership in Tanzania, was summoned to Tanzania’s capital two weeks after the visit to present and train government officials on Convoy of Hope’s innovative model. “This is the new standard to which we want to uphold other NGOs involved in school-based feeding programs,” said one government official.

COMMENT
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Pinterest
Agriculture / In the News / Inspiration / News / Program Updates

Growing hope: Agricultural research in partnership with Convoy of Hope

Convoy of Hope is partnering with Missouri State University agriculture master’s student Jordan Gott to research best practices in growing crops common for the participants in Convoy’s Agriculture Initiative.

Gott’s research centers around the timing of planting corn and lablab — a kind of bean native to Africa. Does planting them at the same time cause competition or do they help each other? Is it better to plant them at the same time or weeks apart? This information will help inform Convoy agronomists on the best way to train and educate farmers in our initiative.

From Missouri to Tanzania

The research began in a greenhouse on the MSU campus, but is now being field tested in Tanzania. With the help of Convoy of Hope staff and the ECHO global seed bank, Gott is growing and monitoring her crops in Arusha, Tanzania.

Gott had to consider some cultural and environmental differences when moving her research from Springfield, MO to Tanzania. There are differences in soil types and irrigation practices. She also had to consider cultural practices, as farmers in Tanzania always plant their corn first.

While she is working to help farmers in Tanzania, Gott is also excited to learn from them.

“I’m excited to go to Tanzania — be in the culture, meet the people and see how they do things,” Gott says. “I’m excited to keep on learning new stuff.”

Follow us for updates on Gott’s work in Tanzania.

COMMENT
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Pinterest
Agriculture
The Empowered Girls performing a song from The Empowered Girls performing a song from "Children of Africa."

Celebrating Women Today and Every Day: Part 2

This is part two of our week celebrating the women in our Women’s Empowerment Program, we are especially excited to highlight our work this week, leading up to International Women’s Day on Sunday, March 8.

This week we are highlighting the seven countries our Women’s Empowerment Program works in. Each day we will be giving away a small gift from each of the countries with a one-of-a-kind gift being given away on International Women’s Day.

————————————————————————————————————————–

Tanzania –

In Tanzania we run a program called Empowered Girls. Empowered Girls has girls’ clubs in seven schools teaching topics like self-esteem, confidence, leadership, conflict resolution and study skills. Lessons are reinforced by fun activities like essay contests, fashion shows and singing.

eg-grad-8

Girls from four Tanzanian schools wrote and recorded an album called “Watoto wa Afrika,” meaning “Children of Africa,” which was launched during the graduation. The album has songs about the challenges they face as girls, including some real-life situations they encounter. Some songs teach girls about how to resolve problems that come up, while others encourage girls and women to know their rights and to stand up for themselves.

We are offering one of their songs for free download today! Just click the button below to download the song “Enaboishu” — written and performed by girls from the program!

EnaboishuDownload Free Now!


—————————————————————————————————————————

El Salvador –

Our Mother’s Clubs in El Salvador teach women job skills training — something they’ve never had before — while also providing self-esteem classes and nutrition and hygiene training.

Edited (1 of 4)

Mother’s Clubs are helping women, like Maria, who is the mother of Jacqueline, 7, and 1-year-old Marcos. She also watches her nephew, Diego, 2, while her sister works. Maria is learning how to run a poultry farm so she can provide her children with food, a home and a better life.

“My dream is for my children to have a future,” she says with a wide smile. “When they are successful, I will know that I worked hard so they could have a good life.”

Today we are giving away this cool bracelet hand made in El Salvador! Share our Facebook post for a chance to win!

Social_giveaways__3L2A3065

————————————————————————————————————————————-

Kenya – 

Kenya is the most recent addition to our Women’s Empowerment Program. Our first graduating class passed through the program near the end of 2014 and have now received seed capitol for starting their own businesses!

We are excited to see how these women’s economic opportunities improve as they continue to work on growing small businesses.

Kenya_5D_SEPT_2014_3L2A4408-2

We believe providing a women with economic freedom makes them more secure and confident of their intrinsic worth and value to their homes and communities.

Today we are excited to give away these beautiful hand printed Convoy of Hope leather notebooks from Kenya! One is an iPad holder and the other is a notebook holder. Share either of our Facebook posts for a chance to win!

Social_giveaways__3L2A2455 Social_giveaways__3L2A2456

 

COMMENT
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Pinterest
Program Updates / Women's Empowerment