Tag: Volunteer

“There’s nothing I can’t do,” Philippines Volunteer with physical disability serves her community

Linda volunteers at one of Convoy of Hope’s many Children’s Feeding program centers based in the Philippines. She was familiar with feeling ashamed of her physical disabilities, but she’s found confidence and purpose by working with Convoy of Hope staff and serving the children in our program.

“There’s nothing I can’t do,” she says.

Watch this video to see how Linda is making a difference through Convoy of Hope.

 

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Program Updates
Sandy Taylor distributes meals during Convoy of Hope's response to COVID-19. Sandy Taylor distributes meals during Convoy of Hope's response to COVID-19.

A Vision For the Future

Just before her 50th birthday, Sandy Taylor — a successful corporate executive — felt oblivious to the suffering in her community and the world.

That year, everything changed when she experienced a life-threatening trauma, resulting in blindness in her right eye. But as her physical vision diminished, the world around her was illuminated. “I began realizing that almost everyone is dealing with something, and I started experiencing a strong compassion for people who were hurting.”

Sandy became involved in Convoy:Women and supporting Women’s Empowerment. “For $1,000, I can change a woman’s life, her family’s life, and an entire community,” she says.

Sandy began considering how she wanted to leave her legacy. “God gave me a peace that I could trust Convoy with the resources He gave me to steward. I want to leave a legacy of compassion and generosity.”

    Here are a few ways to include Convoy of Hope in your legacy and estate planning:

  • Retitle an asset with Convoy of Hope as a transfer on death designation.
  • Name Convoy of Hope as a beneficiary of an IRA account or a life insurance policy.
  • Name Convoy of Hope as a beneficiary of a Donor Advised Fund.
  • Give a gift or bequest from your will or living trust.
  • This story was first published in Convoy of Hope’s Hope Quarterly magazine. Read the rest of the issue here.

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Join the Convoy

Convoy of Hope friend, Vance McDonald, nominated for Walter Payton Award

The Pittsburgh Steelers have selected Vance McDonald as their nominee for the 2020 Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year Award. This award recognizes outstanding players for “excellence on and off the field.” Teams select nominees based on the impact they have had on their community. Previous winners include Kurt Warner, J.J. Watt, Joe Greene, and Petyon and Eli Manning.

“It’s well-deserved and not surprising,” Convoy of Hope’s Convoy Nation Vice President Kirk Noonan said. “Vance’s nature is to look out for the poor and suffering, and do whatever he can in his power to advocate for them, to defend them, and to provide for them. That’s just who he is.”

McDonald brought Convoy of Hope to the Steelers in 2019, and again this December for an annual event the team dubbed “Huddle for the Holidays.”

“I want to take my hat off to Vance McDonald, who was the impetus to get this started and partnering with Convoy of Hope,” Steelers President Art Rooney II said of the event.

Huddle for the Holidays was part of Convoy of Hope’s Pro-Series Community Events where Guests of Honor received groceries, shoes, socks, winter wear, hygiene kits, books, and toys.

McDonald also teamed up with Ben Roethlisberger, quarterback of the team, to bring Convoy of Hope trucks to the greater Pittsburgh area four other times throughout 2020 in response to the COVID-19 crisis.

“Vance is a quality player, a quality teammate, and a quality person,” Steelers Coach Mike Tomlin said. “He’s not low maintenance — he’s no maintenance. He uplifts his teammates, just like he uplifts his community.”

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In the News

Everyday hero serves vulnerable people in her community

Didi, a teacher at a school in the Philippines, works in a remote area with little access to health care. Local tribal groups subsist on root crops, but the economic downturn following COVID-19 further isolated her community from outside resources.

According to the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center, there have been more than 40 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 1.1 million deaths at the time this article was written. The UN has stated that children living in poverty are disproportionately bearing the brunt of the disease and its economic impact.

In response, Convoy of Hope has distributed more than 25 million meals in 31 countries in response to COVID-19. Our international staff is working long hours, many under strict government lockdowns, to ensure we continue serving the people who are most at risk during this pandemic.

Didi is moved to tears when she talks about feeding the students in her class. “I feel like crying. It’s like you are a gift from heaven! Thank you so, so much to all of you.”

The story of the world’s most vulnerable people has played out time and time again as the coronavirus continues to spread and devastate communities that are barely hanging on. Filled with grit and determination, Convoy of Hope is compelled to keep serving those in need.

People like Didi are modern-day heroes. And it’s our joy to supply them with the help and support they need.

This story was first published in Convoy of Hope’s Hope Quarterly magazine. Read the rest of the issue here.

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In the News

Cleveland Volunteer Transforms Life and Community

Cliff Watson knows what it’s like to feel overwhelmed and forgotten. This is why, as the administrative pastor at Providence Baptist Church, he recently helped Convoy of Hope hold Community Events in and around Cleveland, Ohio. Cliff is doing everything he can to help those in his hometown who also resonate with feelings of rejection. 

Cliff’s early life was filled with strife and trauma. “At 12 or 13 years old, I started selling drugs and kind of got into the whole life of the drug world. I just kind of began to live that life for a while,” he says. “I dropped out of high school. My daughter was born when I was 17 years old. People were saying I wouldn’t live to be 20.”

Thankfully, Cliff admitted himself into a local program that helped him to earn his GED, deal with his legal troubles, and get a job. It also inspired him to help others who are living through the same struggles he once did.

Originally, the Convoy of Hope Community Event was designed to be a larger gathering at Luke Easter Park. Once the pandemic became a concern, the event turned into a drive-thru point of distribution (POD). After the city expressed unease about the event taking place at the park, it was redirected to the two campuses of Providence Baptist Church: one in Euclid and one in Cleveland.

An hour before the event, people were already lined up and ready to go through the POD drive-thru. Police officers helped to direct traffic and serve Guests of Honor. In total, the event provided more than 5,000 bags of groceries to those in need.

“That’s why I’m partnered with Convoy of Hope in the first place; it really fits into the bigger picture of community transformation,” Cliff explained. “Before a shovel is ever lifted, before any money and all of those things are distributed, and before a project is even talked about, we just want you to know … that we love you, there is hope, and we can show you that there is hope by bringing hope in on a truck.”

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Community Outreach