Tag: Volunteers

Drivers with loads of hope

Convoy of Hope would be lost without its amazing team of drivers. You can’t have a convoy without anyone to drive it! Each day, our drivers are crossing the country with trucks full of disaster relief supplies, groceries, shoes and most of all — hope.

The drivers help us transport supplies for Community Events, Rural Compassion distributions and disaster responses (including last year’s Hurricanes Harvey and Irma responses). In 2017, they drove more than 414,000 miles for Convoy of Hope.

“These are some phenomenal people,” Convoy staff member, Debbie Gilleylen says. “You know how you always have people backstage getting the work done? These are those people.”

The majority of Convoy drivers are retired and drive for Convoy as volunteers. When we asked some of the drivers what their favorite part of driving for Convoy of Hope is, the answers were synonymous — the people we serve.

“My favorite is when you go and actually get to a place — the joy of the people that are there,” Driver, Richard Wilson, says. “It’s just a blessing to be a part of bringing them something they’re really anxious to receive and to be a part of what they’re doing in the community.”

Convoy of Hope honored its team of drivers and their spouses on Tuesday, January 30, with a lunch and celebration.

“We have a fantastic driving team and a lot of people don’t get to see each other but maybe once a year,” Transportation Director, Mike Coble says. “So, this is that one time a year that we get all the drivers in, as many of the spouses as we can and we get to show our appreciation to them and thank them for their sacrifice and all the hard work they’ve done.”

If you’re interested in joining our volunteer driving team, you can learn more at convoyofhope.org/drivingteam.

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Staff Spotlight / Volunteering
Lisa beams as she stands outside the NBCF tent in Chicago. Lisa beams as she stands outside the NBCF tent in Chicago.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Saving Moms and Daughters

Lisa, a 51-year-old breast cancer survivor wearing a brightly colored “Breast Cancer Survivor” t-shirt, beams as she is greeted at the National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc.® tent by representatives and volunteers. Her smile is one of resilience, determination and gratitude — all honed over her battle with cancer.

“It was devastating,” says Lisa of her diagnosis in 2011. “I was in a state of shock.”

Lisa relied on her friends, family and support groups to get her through the difficult times. She started chemotherapy and radiation and in late 2012 received the best news she could receive — she was cancer-free.

When asked how it felt when she heard those words come from her doctor, Lisa took a deep breath then slowly exhaled. Her body seemed to slip into a peaceful stance. “Joy,” she said as her eyes filled with tears.

Later in the day, more tears fell under the NBCF tent — but this time from a volunteer. Stacey, age 46, was decked out in all her breast cancer awareness accessories as a way to honor her late mother, who lost her battle with breast cancer in 2010.

“I hope she’s proud of me,” Stacey says of her mother, noting that the NBCF tent is important for women because of the early detection education and support services they offer. Throughout the day, Stacey could be heard encouraging other women to be aware and know their bodies so that they can take control of their health — a key talking point passed onto each woman who comes through the tent.

“It means a lot to me that these resources exist,” says Stacey of the education and services offered by NBCF. “Being aware saves mothers and daughters, and if I can help one person with my story — it’s worth it.”

For more information, visit nbcf.org.

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Community Outreach / Inspiration / Partner Spotlight
Shannon volunteered in the National Breast Cancer Foundation tent at our recent community event in Sioux City, IA. Shannon volunteered in the National Breast Cancer Foundation tent at our recent community event in Sioux City, IA.

Hello, my name is Shannon

Next month is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Shannon—a volunteer at our recent Sioux City, Iowa community event—has gotten us off to a head start. After volunteering in the National Breast Cancer Foundation tent all day, she left us this note.

“Hello, my name is Shannon, I’m 19 years old and I attend nursing school in Iowa. Today while volunteering I told people the importance of early screening for breast cancer. The reason I came today was [because] I was want to make a difference in peoples lives, and telling them about preventative measures for breast cancer could potentially save their life.

I know from experience the importance of catching breast cancer at an early stage. My Aunt and Grandma both are breast cancer survivors. Just telling someone to get their yearly mammograms is important.

I would like to volunteer to inform people about breast cancer and how life-threatening it can be. Also, I want to fundraise at my college to help the National Breast Cancer Foundation through Convoy of Hope. Reaching out to others about breast cancer awareness is my ultimate goal … and to spread the word about Convoy of Hope.”

Wow! Shannon gets it, doesn’t she? We’re grateful for incredible volunteers like Shannon, who come ready to serve, then leave changed and ready to serve more!

Have you been to one of our community events? What was your experience?

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Community Outreach / Program Updates