is a faith-based, international, humanitarian-relief organization strategically based in Springfield, Missouri — the crossroads of America. Since being founded in 1994 Convoy of Hope has helped more than 65 million people who are impoverished, hungry and hurting.

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Our Impact Since 1994

  • Impact Icon

    67,596,598 67.6 m

    People served by Convoy of Hope since 1994. Learn More »
  • Impact Icon

    146,676

    Children enrolled in Children’s Feeding Initiative. Learn More »
  • Impact Icon

    444,636

    Volunteers mobilized to help children, families and survivors of disasters. Learn More »
  • 113

    Countries served since our founding. Learn More »
  • $440,084,321 $440.08 m

    Worth of food and supplies distributed. Learn More »

Learn about what we do

Disaster Services

Hope
in every storm.

We are highly regarded for our scalable distribution model, Disaster Services teams, six international warehouses and a Mobile Command Center. Consistently, we are among the first to respond to disasters throughout the world. We have helped millions of people in the aftermath of disasters by working with and through churches, businesses, government agencies and other nonprofits.

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Join the convoy and deliver Hope to the World.

Because of our partners, we're doing more good for more people.

Hope takes teamwork.
  • National Breast Cancer Foundation
  • Procter & Gamble
  • Plum Organics
  • Home Depot
  • TOMS Shoes
  • Cargill

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Three Reasons to Celebrate Mother Teresa’s Birthday Today

If Mother Teresa were alive on her birthday today, she would be 104 years old. The Roman Catholic humanitarian and Nobel Peace Prize winner died at the age of 87 in 1997, yet we believe there is great cause to continue to remember her life and celebrate the time that she spent here with us. Here are three reasons that we’re celebrating Mother Teresa’s Birthday and we think you should too.

No. 1 “Everyone can do something.”

We think Mother Teresa is a lot like you and a lot like us. She was a human being who understood her shortcomings and weaknesses yet still chose to use what gifts, abilities and resources she had to help others. Because of her self-awareness, she wasn’t afraid to challenge anyone and everyone to do something to help others.

Hal Donaldson, our president and co-founder, went to meet Mother Teresa in India years ago. Here’s his recollection of his conversation with the woman we celebrate today.

Within minutes of meeting Mother Teresa she had unknowingly helped set a new course for my life by asking me a simple question: “Hal, what are you doing to help the poor and suffering?”

“Nothing, really,” I answered honestly, wishing I could have had something better to report.

She looked at me kindly and said, “Everyone can do something.”

Shortly, after that meeting with Mother Teresa in India, Hal and his brothers began distributing food from the back of a pickup truck to families in need in California. In the years since, Convoy of Hope has reached around the world into the lives of more than 65 million people who are hungry, impoverished and hurting.

No. 2 “your next door neighbor.”

So often when we think of helping others, we think of somehow helping a child or family in another country. Which is great: we should be willing to help anyone and everyone who has need. Without your generosity, Convoy of Hope wouldn’t be able to provide healthy meals to more than 145,000 children in 11 nations. With that said, when we think about helping we should not just look “there,” but also “here.”

Mother Teresa is known for founding a work that has helped people in more than 130 countries, but she is most well known for her work in Calcutta, and for her service to the person in front of her. Recently we wrote about the time she said, “I want you to be concerned about your next door neighbor. Do you know your next door neighbor?”

No. 3 “just feed one.”

A few years ago Hal Donaldson was talking with his daughter about the kids that Convoy of Hope helps to feed. They got to talking about all the kids on the waiting list who didn’t have enough to eat. With young inquisitiveness, she asked something like, “If everyone just helped feed one, wouldn’t that be enough?”

Mother Teresa made a similar suggestion that, along with Hal’s daughter’s question, has inspired feedONE, an initiative of Convoy of Hope that aims to help bring an end to extreme hunger in our lifetime. She said, “If you can’t feed a hundred people, then just feed one.”

If you follow us on Twitter, you might have noticed Kobe Bryant and others wishing someone else happy birthday on our behalf.

Disney star and Hollywood Records multi-platinum recording artist, Zendaya, is turning 18 in a few days. To celebrate, she’s taking Mother Teresa’s advice.

Watch a video from ZendayaJUST FEED ONE

COMMENT
Inspiration

Hope is central to what we do and it’s central to who we are. According to our name, hope is what we carry and it’s why we go.

Our 300,000 square foot World Distribution Center sits smackdab at America’s crossroads in Springfield, Mo. I think it’s pretty cool that with hope at our center, we get to deliver hope all across the United States from the Central Midwest.

Based on this same idea, we named this blog The Hope Supply, where hope is the heart of the story.

It’s a simple notion. Here at Convoy of Hope, hope is central. What’s central to you?

 

COMMENT
Inspiration
The view above Ethiopia's capitol city of Addis Ababa. The view above Ethiopia's capitol city of Addis Ababa.

No, I am just visiting

An African proverb says, “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” I often think of that proverb when I consider the work we’re doing around the world together.

We are unifying people, businesses, nonprofit organizations and government agencies around a movement of hope. We’re going far, and we’re doing it together.

Once as I was walking through immigration in Ethiopia, I learned I had mistakenly omitted the answers to a few questions on the admittance form. The security agent asked, “Occupation?”

I replied with a little chuckle, “No, I am just visiting.”Ethiopia-March-2014__0864 copyThis is the mindset of all who are involved with Convoy of Hope. We’ll travel to the ends of the earth to give of ourselves — not as occupiers but as visitors working together.

Alazer, a young boy in our feeding program in Ethiopia, is the reason we do what we do.The red dust on the playground swirls into the air as Alazer, 5, leads a group of about 30 children in dancing in circles and singing at his school in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

“Come, follow me!” he tells them.

It’s evident Alazer is a leader as the boys and girls fall in line behind him, following him around in circles.

Alazer and the other children in Convoy of Hope’s Children’s Feeding Initiative at his school just received a lunch meal of injera (traditional Ethiopian bread) and sauce. Their energy level is high as they play.

“When I did not have food in my lunchbox, I was sad,” says Alazer, an aspiring doctor. “Now I am happy and satisfied.”

Genet Abay, program coordinator in Ethiopia, says 400 children are now being fed every school day in Ethiopia.

COMMENT
From The Founders / Program Updates