We are a non-profit organization that has helped more than 67 million people throughout the world by sharing food, water, emergency supplies, agricultural know how, and opportunities that empower people to live independent lives free from poverty. We do this by:

Mobilizing tens of thousands of volunteers each year

Partnering with strong, like-minded organizations who do good work among the poor and suffering

Transparency, we are a multi-year recipient of the prestigious, Four Star Charity Award from Charity Navigator.

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Our Impact Since 1994

  • Impact Icon

    67,596,598 67.6 m

    People served by Convoy of Hope since 1994. Learn More »
  • Impact Icon

    146,676

    Children enrolled in Children’s Feeding Initiative. Learn More »
  • Impact Icon

    444,636

    Volunteers mobilized to help children, families and survivors of disasters. Learn More »
  • 113

    Countries served since our founding. Learn More »
  • $440,084,321 $440.08 m

    Worth of food and supplies distributed. Learn More »

Learn about what we do

Disaster Services

Hope
in every storm.

We are highly regarded for our scalable distribution model, Disaster Services teams, six international warehouses and a Mobile Command Center. Consistently, we are among the first to respond to disasters throughout the world. We have helped millions of people in the aftermath of disasters by working with and through churches, businesses, government agencies and other nonprofits.

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Join the convoy and deliver Hope to the World.

Because of our partners, we're doing more good for more people.

Hope takes teamwork.
  • National Breast Cancer Foundation
  • Procter & Gamble
  • Plum Organics
  • Home Depot
  • TOMS Shoes
  • Cargill

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Hope isn’t expensive

If you’ve heard Hal Donaldson speak, you know that he has a way with finding just the right words to make you aware of something that you already wholeheartedly believe in but never had words for. A couple years back, he was talking to our team and did exactly that when he said, “hope is not expensive, but it does cost us something.” If I remember right, Hal was making a charge for Convoy of Hope staff to go beyond our employment and find ways to give people hope with our personal lives.

You’re reading the last in a series about hope. We don’t have the corner on hope, but we experience all sides of it every day and we thought we ought to dedicate some blog posts to sharing the hope that we have with you. Catch up on posts one, two, three and four.

Odds are that your profession is not centered around delivering hope to people facing hard situations. However, that doesn’t mean you can’t spend yourself on behalf of others. Think of the places where people are: at work, at grocery stores, in the United States, around the world, driving, in parenthood, at school, at restaurants, at the beach (I have a few words for you if you’re at the beach.) The places where people are, are the places that need the hope you have. Giving hope to people where you are doesn’t require a change of profession, but it will cost you something. In most cases it will cost you time, some cases money, others a smile, but in every case the return will exponentially outweigh your investment. Jesus is probably most quoted for saying; “give and it will be given to you.”

Hope makes daily work of turning down people’s doubts while turning up the corners of their mouths. 

Try it out. Start wearing your hope on your sleeve, or maybe on your forehead. ZendayaHOPEblog

COMMENT
Inspiration

Keep dreams alive

When my brothers and my sister and I were kids, we knew what it was like to have an empty cupboard.

Our father was killed by a drunken driver which forced our injured mother to work long hours to make ends meet. But even with government-issued food stamps, there were times we didn’t have enough.

Fortunately, friends and neighbors brought groceries to our door. I’ll never forget diving into nthose bags of groceries. Every can of soup—every box of cereal—gave us hope that tomorrow could be better than today.

We learned firsthand the pain of an empty stomach—and the peace that accompanies a hot meal.

Because of friends like you, 147,000 children (in 11 countries) are enrolled in Convoy of Hope’s children’s feeding initiative. They can wake up each morning without fear. The meals you provide are keeping their dreams alive.

I remember how difficult it was to learn in school when my stomach was empty. But for 147,000 children, hunger is no longer a threat to their education, their futures. You are keeping them in school. And, as a result, one day they will be teachers, pastors, accountants and doctors.

Thank you for partnering with us to make dreams come true.

COMMENT
From The Founders

HOPE reaches

So much is out of reach. Right? If I’m elected Mayor of my mid-sized community, my chances of being chosen for Governor or President of the United States later on are probably pretty slim if we’re being honest. If I’m just some guy with a house, two red dogs and kids who play with — and sometimes eat — play-dough, I’m probably not thinking; “Hey, that Mayor job, I could grab that if I wanted it.”

On the whole, people in poverty seem to have a hard time imagining moving up to middle-class. The middle-class woman feels the same way about the upper-class woman. Like-wise, the guy who just became a millionaire probably doesn’t think he’ll be paying for Bill Gates’ lunch someday. See where I’m going? Like it or not, we live in a world where so much seems to be out of reach. There is hardly anything that is absolutely available to every single breathing human.

Hardly anything, but there is something.

No man can contain it, but everyone can have it — hope. You see, the thing about hope is that it’s really nearly impossible to keep to yourself. Once you have it, the people near you are bound to have it soon enough.

So, find hope. It’s well within your reach. But, when you do find hope,  be ready to give it away like nobody’s business.

You just read the fourth post in a series about hope. I’m partial, but I think you should catch up on one, two and three. When was a time in your life where everything seemed out of reach but you found hope? We’d love to hear your story, tell us in the comments below.

Want to give hope to kids? $10 feeds a child for a monthGive Hope

COMMENT
Inspiration