is a faith-based, international, humanitarian-relief organization strategically based in Springfield, Missouri — the crossroads of America. Since being founded in 1994 Convoy of Hope has helped more than 65 million people who are impoverished, hungry and hurting.

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Our Impact Since 1994

  • Impact Icon

    67,596,598 67.6 m

    People served by Convoy of Hope since 1994. Learn More »
  • Impact Icon

    146,676

    Children enrolled in Children’s Feeding Initiative. Learn More »
  • Impact Icon

    444,636

    Volunteers mobilized to help children, families and survivors of disasters. Learn More »
  • 113

    Countries served since our founding. Learn More »
  • $440,084,321 $440.08 m

    Worth of food and supplies distributed. Learn More »

Learn about what we do

Disaster Services

Hope
in every storm.

We are highly regarded for our scalable distribution model, Disaster Services teams, six international warehouses and a Mobile Command Center. Consistently, we are among the first to respond to disasters throughout the world. We have helped millions of people in the aftermath of disasters by working with and through churches, businesses, government agencies and other nonprofits.

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Join the convoy and deliver Hope to the World.

Because of our partners, we're doing more good for more people.

Hope takes teamwork.
  • National Breast Cancer Foundation
  • Procter & Gamble
  • Plum Organics
  • Home Depot
  • TOMS Shoes
  • Cargill

Browsing: View Blog

Rural Compassion volunteers help to repair a church roof in Seneca, Ill. Rural Compassion volunteers help to repair a church roof in Seneca, Ill.

Rural Compassion impacts small Illinois town

Convoy of Hope’s Rural Compassion Initiative recently helped coordinate a team of 30 volunteers from Calvary Church of Naperville, Ill., who helped renovate a church and held a community outreach event in Seneca, Ill., just west of Chicago.

“We were there for an entire week to show support for the people of Seneca,” says Kent Anderson, church care network coordinator for Rural Compassion. “It was incredible to see people from one community investing so much time and love in one another.”

The community event was a deemed “Mom’s Day” and included free haircuts, car washes, gift bags, oil changes, books and more for 100 guests of honor.

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Rural Compassion

Singing and clapping, laughing, squealing and children’s feet playing. This is the chorus that greets visitors to the schools and children’s homes where our Children’s Feeding Initiative feeds more than 146,000 children throughout the week. It’s the sound of happiness.

Yet, if you’re reading this blog post on a computer or mobile device, these children have almost certainly never known the comforts of life that you know. In fact, in most cases they have experienced great loss and poverty. It’s what they enjoy, not what they have, that makes them happy.

Enjoy much today.

Then, consider giving something you have to our work throughout the world — you might just enjoy that too!

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Inspiration
Jason Streubel, Ph.D and director of agriculture for Convoy of Hope, sits on a Kubota tractor preparing the soil behind our World Distribution Center for a Community Garden. Jason Streubel, Ph.D and director of agriculture for Convoy of Hope, sits on a Kubota tractor preparing the soil behind our World Distribution Center for a Community Garden.

Cultivating Hope with Community Gardens

On a cloudy day in a field behind Convoy of Hope’s World Distribution Center in Springfield, Mo., Jason Streubel, Ph.D and director of agriculture for Convoy of Hope, sits on a Kubota tractor grinning from ear-to-ear.

Here, in the heart of the city of more than 160,000 residents, an eight-foot barbed wire fence surrounds land on one side. On the other, a deer darts into a wooded area. The smell of freshly-tilled soil fills the air.

Streubel will use this half-acre in collaboration with local universities to plant fall crops and conduct variety trials. The team will collect soil samples, monitor growth rates and yield, and harvest crops.

“This field allows us to do research,” says Streubel. “As our organization gains academic credibility, it opens up relationships so that we can improve our techniques and feed more children.”

According to Streubel, the study also provides opportunity for grants that can be used to develop agriculture initiatives worldwide. Community gardens like this one have also been launched to aid the working poor in targeted areas, like Detroit. In Haiti, 3,600 farmers have been trained by Streubel’s team in management practices specific to their region.Cultivating Hope 1 Cultivating Hope 3

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Agriculture / Program Updates