Delivering Hope Since 1994

Convoy of Hope was founded in 1994 by the Donaldson family. Their inspiration for starting the organization can be traced back to the many people who helped their family after their father, Harold, was killed by a drunk driver in 1969. Today, more than 65 million people have been served throughout the world by Convoy of Hope. We are proud that we work through churches, businesses, government agencies and other nonprofits to provide help and hope to those who are impoverished, hungry and hurting.

As a faith-based, international, humanitarian-relief organization strategically based in Springfield, Missouri — the crossroads of America — our goal is to bring help and hope to those who are impoverished, hungry and hurting.

We do this by:

ENGAGING

Each year — in dozens of communities throughout the nation — guests of honor receive free groceries, health and dental screenings, haircuts, family portraits, hot meals, job-placement assistance and much more at our signature events.

CARING

We partner, resource and empower rural churches through training, mentoring and coaching so they can enhance their presence in their communities. The strategy works best when church leaders partner with community leaders and stakeholders.

NOURISHING

More than 145,000 children in 11 nations are being fed nutritious meals by us. The food opens doors for education, clean water, a sense of hope and much more. Currently, we are feeding children in the Philippines, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Honduras, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Kenya, Ethiopia, Guatemala, South Africa and Tanzania.

GROWING

Impoverished farmers and families are equipped with the skills, tools and seeds to produce life-sustaining crops through the agricultural work we conduct throughout the world. Each year, tens of thousands of meals are harvested for our children’s feeding work and income is generated for farmers.

RESPONDING

Consistently among the first to respond to disasters throughout the world. We are highly regarded for our scalable distribution model, Disaster Response teams, six international warehouses and Mobile Command Center.

PARTNERING

We empower like-minded organizations, who are doing good work among the poor and suffering in their communities. This is accomplished by providing such friends with food, water, supplies and much more.

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(l to r) Hal Donaldson, co-founder and president of Convoy of Hope and Clif Smart, president of Missouri State University sign a MOU on October 28, 2014. (l to r) Hal Donaldson, co-founder and president of Convoy of Hope and Clif Smart, president of Missouri State University sign a MOU on October 28, 2014.

MSU and Convoy of Hope launch collaboration

Missouri State University (MSU) and Convoy of Hope signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) today to increase and improve agriculture and water availability in Haiti and possibly other developing countries, through extension services and scientific and academic research.

The MOU is consistent with MSU’s public affairs mission; the three pillars of which are ethical leadership, cultural competence and community engagement. The agreement is also consistent with Convoy of Hope’s mission to provide help and hope to those who are impoverished, hungry and hurting.

“We’re excited about the opportunity this agreement presents for Missouri State students and faculty to share their skills and apply their knowledge,” said Clif Smart, Missouri State president. “Our partnership with Convoy of Hope in Haiti and other countries is a meaningful way to apply our public affairs mission.”

Under the MOU, MSU and Convoy of Hope will develop, execute and implement extension services, education and research projects pertaining to agriculture and other related projects. These projects will be planned jointly, subject to availability of funding and the specific approval of the presidents of MSU and Convoy of Hope. The university will serve as lead agency, and through its faculty and staff, will contribute expertise and experience in scientific and academic research, grant writing and application, and similar related areas.

“MSU has been a valuable partner for Convoy of Hope for many years,” says Hal Donaldson, president and co-founder of Convoy of Hope. “We look forward to continuing this relationship so that more people can be served in the future.”

The areas of cooperation include agriculture-related outreach and development programs in countries where Convoy of Hope is actively engaged, including Haiti. Other countries may be subsequently agreed to including the Philippines, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Kenya, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala, the Dominican Republic, South Africa and the United States.

The agreement also involves student exchanges between MSU and Convoy of Hope projects for the purpose of education, training, community service, international development service and experience. Additional opportunities for further collaboration may be explored over time.

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Convoy of Hope's Disaster Services Team preps for a response at the World Distribution Center in Springfield, Mo. Convoy of Hope's Disaster Services Team preps for a response at the World Distribution Center in Springfield, Mo.

Prepared and ready for next disaster

One of the reasons Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services Team is regularly one of the first to respond to disasters is preparation.

“After every disaster we start preparing for the next one,” says Chris Dudley, disaster services response director. “All our equipment is checked, cleaned, repaired and organized so that we’re ready at a moment’s notice.”

In addition to being prepared, members of Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services Team monitor storms, earthquakes and other disasters 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

“We are constantly gathering critical information on events in the United States and around the world so that we can move quickly and efficiently in times of disaster,” adds Dudley. “We’re grateful for the supporters who have invested in Convoy of Hope so that we can bring help and hope to people in need.”

Currently our Disaster Services team is coordinating relief efforts in response to the Ebola Crisis in West Africa. Containers of food are currently en route. So far this year, the team has monitored 909 disaster events around the world.

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Disaster Services

Keep dreams alive

When my brothers and my sister and I were kids, we knew what it was like to have an empty cupboard.

Our father was killed by a drunken driver which forced our injured mother to work long hours to make ends meet. But even with government-issued food stamps, there were times we didn’t have enough.

Fortunately, friends and neighbors brought groceries to our door. I’ll never forget diving into nthose bags of groceries. Every can of soup—every box of cereal—gave us hope that tomorrow could be better than today.

We learned firsthand the pain of an empty stomach—and the peace that accompanies a hot meal.

Because of friends like you, 147,000 children (in 11 countries) are enrolled in Convoy of Hope’s children’s feeding initiative. They can wake up each morning without fear. The meals you provide are keeping their dreams alive.

I remember how difficult it was to learn in school when my stomach was empty. But for 147,000 children, hunger is no longer a threat to their education, their futures. You are keeping them in school. And, as a result, one day they will be teachers, pastors, accountants and doctors.

Thank you for partnering with us to make dreams come true.

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From The Founders