Delivering Hope Since 1994

Convoy of Hope was founded in 1994 by the Donaldson family. Their inspiration for starting the organization can be traced back to the many people who helped their family after their father, Harold, was killed by a drunk driver in 1969. Today, more than 65 million people have been served throughout the world by Convoy of Hope. We are proud that we work through churches, businesses, government agencies and other nonprofits to provide help and hope to those who are impoverished, hungry and hurting.

As a faith-based, international, humanitarian-relief organization strategically based in Springfield, Missouri — the crossroads of America — our goal is to bring help and hope to those who are impoverished, hungry and hurting.

We do this by:

ENGAGING

Each year — in dozens of communities throughout the nation — guests of honor receive free groceries, health and dental screenings, haircuts, family portraits, hot meals, job-placement assistance and much more at our signature events.

CARING

We partner, resource and empower rural churches through training, mentoring and coaching so they can enhance their presence in their communities. The strategy works best when church leaders partner with community leaders and stakeholders.

NOURISHING

More than 145,000 children in 11 nations are being fed nutritious meals by us. The food opens doors for education, clean water, a sense of hope and much more. Currently, we are feeding children in the Philippines, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Honduras, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Kenya, Ethiopia, Guatemala, South Africa and Tanzania.

GROWING

Impoverished farmers and families are equipped with the skills, tools and seeds to produce life-sustaining crops through the agricultural work we conduct throughout the world. Each year, tens of thousands of meals are harvested for our children’s feeding work and income is generated for farmers.

RESPONDING

Consistently among the first to respond to disasters throughout the world. We are highly regarded for our scalable distribution model, Disaster Response teams, six international warehouses and Mobile Command Center.

PARTNERING

We empower like-minded organizations, who are doing good work among the poor and suffering in their communities. This is accomplished by providing such friends with food, water, supplies and much more.

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Rural Compassion volunteers help to repair a church roof in Seneca, Ill. Rural Compassion volunteers help to repair a church roof in Seneca, Ill.

Rural Compassion impacts small Illinois town

Convoy of Hope’s Rural Compassion Initiative recently helped coordinate a team of 30 volunteers from Calvary Church of Naperville, Ill., who helped renovate a church and held a community outreach event in Seneca, Ill., just west of Chicago.

“We were there for an entire week to show support for the people of Seneca,” says Kent Anderson, church care network coordinator for Rural Compassion. “It was incredible to see people from one community investing so much time and love in one another.”

The community event was a deemed “Mom’s Day” and included free haircuts, car washes, gift bags, oil changes, books and more for 100 guests of honor.

COMMENT
Rural Compassion
Jason Streubel, Ph.D and director of agriculture for Convoy of Hope, sits on a Kubota tractor preparing the soil behind our World Distribution Center for a Community Garden. Jason Streubel, Ph.D and director of agriculture for Convoy of Hope, sits on a Kubota tractor preparing the soil behind our World Distribution Center for a Community Garden.

Cultivating Hope with Community Gardens

On a cloudy day in a field behind Convoy of Hope’s World Distribution Center in Springfield, Mo., Jason Streubel, Ph.D and director of agriculture for Convoy of Hope, sits on a Kubota tractor grinning from ear-to-ear.

Here, in the heart of the city of more than 160,000 residents, an eight-foot barbed wire fence surrounds land on one side. On the other, a deer darts into a wooded area. The smell of freshly-tilled soil fills the air.

Streubel will use this half-acre in collaboration with local universities to plant fall crops and conduct variety trials. The team will collect soil samples, monitor growth rates and yield, and harvest crops.

“This field allows us to do research,” says Streubel. “As our organization gains academic credibility, it opens up relationships so that we can improve our techniques and feed more children.”

According to Streubel, the study also provides opportunity for grants that can be used to develop agriculture initiatives worldwide. Community gardens like this one have also been launched to aid the working poor in targeted areas, like Detroit. In Haiti, 3,600 farmers have been trained by Streubel’s team in management practices specific to their region.Cultivating Hope 1 Cultivating Hope 3

COMMENT
Agriculture / Program Updates

In Plains, Mt., members of this small, rural town of 1,000 are putting their hands to work to meet the needs of their community. One way is by falling, splitting and delivering free firewood to those who need it to survive the tough, long winters of Montana. They’re using local resources to provide local solutions. And helping resource and train them along the way has been members of our Rural Compassion team. Pretty cool stuff.

Pastor Jim Sinclair of Church on the Move is at the helm of this effort and I was encouraged by his quote from a recent interview — “You can only be a sheep for a little while. Then you have to become a ranch hand.”

What steps can you take TODAY to stop being a sheep and become a ranch hand? Share your ideas on Facebook or Twitter and mention @convoyofhope.

COMMENT
Inspiration / Rural Compassion