Delivering Hope Since 1994

Convoy of Hope was founded in 1994 by the Donaldson family. Their inspiration for starting the organization can be traced back to the many people who helped their family after their father, Harold, was killed by a drunk driver in 1969. Today, more than 65 million people have been served throughout the world by Convoy of Hope. We are proud that we work through churches, businesses, government agencies and other nonprofits to provide help and hope to those who are impoverished, hungry and hurting.

As a faith-based, international, humanitarian-relief organization strategically based in Springfield, Missouri — the crossroads of America — our goal is to bring help and hope to those who are impoverished, hungry and hurting.

We do this by:

ENGAGING

Each year — in dozens of communities throughout the nation — guests of honor receive free groceries, health and dental screenings, haircuts, family portraits, hot meals, job-placement assistance and much more at our signature events.

CARING

We partner, resource and empower rural churches through training, mentoring and coaching so they can enhance their presence in their communities. The strategy works best when church leaders partner with community leaders and stakeholders.

NOURISHING

More than 145,000 children in 11 nations are being fed nutritious meals by us. The food opens doors for education, clean water, a sense of hope and much more. Currently, we are feeding children in the Philippines, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Honduras, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Kenya, Ethiopia, Guatemala, South Africa and Tanzania.

GROWING

Impoverished farmers and families are equipped with the skills, tools and seeds to produce life-sustaining crops through the agricultural work we conduct throughout the world. Each year, tens of thousands of meals are harvested for our children’s feeding work and income is generated for farmers.

RESPONDING

Consistently among the first to respond to disasters throughout the world. We are highly regarded for our scalable distribution model, Disaster Response teams, six international warehouses and Mobile Command Center.

PARTNERING

We empower like-minded organizations, who are doing good work among the poor and suffering in their communities. This is accomplished by providing such friends with food, water, supplies and much more.

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14 pre-med and science students from Evangel University joined Convoy of Hope's Agriculture Initiative in Haiti to help provide education to local Haitian farmers. 14 pre-med and science students from Evangel University joined Convoy of Hope's Agriculture Initiative in Haiti to help provide education to local Haitian farmers.

What does education carry?

When we stepped into the church building in Turpin on a mild morning, 55 men and women were already seated on the narrow wooden benches, ready to learn. This particular Convoy of Hope Agriculture training session was one of four that we conducted in Haiti that week. We had a group of 14 pre-med and science students from Evangel University with us. Each of them had prepared to teach topics, ranging from basic plant nutrition to pest control methods, to new farmers in our ongoing seed program. It was an invaluable opportunity for everyone involved.

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When I look back on this week, a few things stand out to me that highlighted the significance of this trip, and of education.

I can picture the eagerness in the eyes of the Haitian farmers as they drank in the information that we gave them about how to make their crops grow well, so that they can provide for their families.

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I can see the kids filling up the doorways on either side of the church building, their curiosity getting the best of them as they passed by.

I also see the initial hesitancy on the faces of the university students as they stepped outside of their comfort zones and became the teachers, and then the way that their enthusiasm blossomed as the trainings progressed. There is a special joy that comes from having the opportunity to teach something meaningful, that you’ve learned, to others.

As a recent college graduate and someone who loves learning, these feelings are all familiar to me. I know, first hand, the worth of a good education. It is something that many people do not have access to all over the world. It is something that people are willing to pay a great price for, whether that is taking out thousands of dollars in loans or making the lengthy journey on foot to get to a place of learning. An education is something that these 14 university students from southwest Missouri now have in common with just over 3,400 farmers in the mountains of Haiti and beyond through our Agricultural Initiatives—and that number keeps growing.

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Our Agriculture program at Convoy of Hope provides many tangible resources to our farmers in Haiti but what I am most passionate about is that we are able to provide expertise in agriculture that has all but disappeared from the country. I believe that this education is the irreplaceable tool that we can place in their hands to create sustainable change. Although the resources that we can provide eventually reach a limit, education carries immeasurable potential. It is a long-term investment that can carry over from generation to generation, continuing to provide meals and lift people out of poverty for years to come.

Help Convoy of Hope to serve people from one generation to the nextGive Hope

 

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Agriculture / Program Updates
Gail Starnes, a local volunteer coordinator for the Convoy of Hope community event in Wichita was recently interviewed on the Brett and Sierra show on KWCH12. Gail Starnes, a local volunteer coordinator for the Convoy of Hope community event in Wichita was recently interviewed on the Brett and Sierra show on KWCH12.

Expecting great things in Wichita

We’re expecting an incredible day for thousands of guests of honor and volunteers on Saturday, August 2, at our community event in Wichita, Kan. Watch this local news story to see what volunteers and guests of honor experience at a Convoy of Hope community event.

Learn about attending, volunteering and more Wichita Community Event

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Community Outreach / In The News / Program Updates
Rural Compassion volunteers help to repair a church roof in Seneca, Ill. Rural Compassion volunteers help to repair a church roof in Seneca, Ill.

Rural Compassion impacts small Illinois town

Convoy of Hope’s Rural Compassion Initiative recently helped coordinate a team of 30 volunteers from Calvary Church of Naperville, Ill., who helped renovate a church and held a community outreach event in Seneca, Ill., just west of Chicago.

“We were there for an entire week to show support for the people of Seneca,” says Kent Anderson, church care network coordinator for Rural Compassion. “It was incredible to see people from one community investing so much time and love in one another.”

The community event was a deemed “Mom’s Day” and included free haircuts, car washes, gift bags, oil changes, books and more for 100 guests of honor.

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Rural Compassion
Jason Streubel, Ph.D and director of agriculture for Convoy of Hope, sits on a Kubota tractor preparing the soil behind our World Distribution Center for a Community Garden. Jason Streubel, Ph.D and director of agriculture for Convoy of Hope, sits on a Kubota tractor preparing the soil behind our World Distribution Center for a Community Garden.

Cultivating Hope with Community Gardens

On a cloudy day in a field behind Convoy of Hope’s World Distribution Center in Springfield, Mo., Jason Streubel, Ph.D and director of agriculture for Convoy of Hope, sits on a Kubota tractor grinning from ear-to-ear.

Here, in the heart of the city of more than 160,000 residents, an eight-foot barbed wire fence surrounds land on one side. On the other, a deer darts into a wooded area. The smell of freshly-tilled soil fills the air.

Streubel will use this half-acre in collaboration with local universities to plant fall crops and conduct variety trials. The team will collect soil samples, monitor growth rates and yield, and harvest crops.

“This field allows us to do research,” says Streubel. “As our organization gains academic credibility, it opens up relationships so that we can improve our techniques and feed more children.”

According to Streubel, the study also provides opportunity for grants that can be used to develop agriculture initiatives worldwide. Community gardens like this one have also been launched to aid the working poor in targeted areas, like Detroit. In Haiti, 3,600 farmers have been trained by Streubel’s team in management practices specific to their region.Cultivating Hope 1 Cultivating Hope 3

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Agriculture / Program Updates