Staff Spotlight: Bringing Good Will to All

One might call Will Leidecker our Staff Accountant in Finance. We like to call him our friend.

Where’s home?
Branson, Missouri

What are some of your hobbies?
I enjoy rock climbing, canoeing and camping. Right now, I’m also reading a friend’s book and helping another one of my buddies fix up a bus. You know…normal bachelor stuff.

What’s one of your favorite places in Springfield?
Cherry Picker Package X Fare is a local coffee shop cafe with a cool vibe. They even have fire pits. It’s a great spot to hang out on the weekends.

Do you have any good stories?
I once traveled to Nicaragua to build houses and drill wells. I also went with my friend Marvin, who works with gang members, to visit a prison there. One of the prisoners gave me a bracelet made from a plastic bag. I wear it to remember the people and memories I made on that trip.

Why do you love your job?
My team is great. They want to make everything better, so they listen to what I have to say. I wanted to do something impactful with my career, and I can do that here.

Here’s a co-worker compliment:
Will’s ninja-like CPA skills keep us all afloat and moving steady. He works well with others and shares. He shows the hallmark sign of a truly great accountant, as his desk is often as messy as mine.

I think I can speak for the entire organization when I say we’re glad Will’s on the accounting team, where everybody counts!

~ Jon Krepinevich
Divisional Finance Director

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Staff Spotlight

Hope for Families in San Antonio

“We hit the jackpot!” exclaims Sarah and Dre Valdez’s youngest son as he triumphantly holds two grocery bags loaded with food. He’s only seven, but even he understands the importance of what took place for his family — and thousands of others — at the San Antonio Community Event.

Like many people who attend Convoy’s Community Events, times have been tough for the Valdez family. Both Sarah and Dre recently lost their jobs and have been unable to find work. The free goods and services they received gave them a hand up during a difficult season in their life.

“You forget yourself and your burdens for a while,” says their mom, Sarah. “It was a blessing to come to Convoy of Hope and get things we needed.”

With smiles as wide as the Alamodome, the family of six poses for a photo. Afterward, they collect the new shoes and bags of groceries they received at the event and step into their futures with a renewed sense of hope.

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Community Outreach

A New Life for Sheri

Sheri, 7, and her family live at the base of a toxic garbage range in the Philippines. Their home is nothing but flimsy scraps of plywood, tattered sheets of plastic and bamboo strips held together by rusty nails and ropes. This is no place for children — especially ones whose parents can’t afford to send them to school.

When we first met Sheri, she was undernourished and sad because she didn’t have food and wasn’t in school. She spent her days caring for her little brother and wondering if she would ever get to go to school.

Because of generous friends, we were able to enroll Sheri in our Children’s Feeding Initiative. Today, her health, life and future are secure with daily meals, clean drinking water and wonderful days in school.

This newfound way of living has energized her and left a wide smile on her face.

Convoy of Hope’s friends have made a new life possible for Sheri.

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Children's Feeding

Replace Fear with Kindness on World Refugee Day

A few short weeks ago, I visited the home of a single mother to three boys. She sat quietly next to me and we tried to nonverbally communicate through a series of smiles, nervous laughter and gestures. She reminded me of other mothers; strong, caring and loving. The difference between this mother and other mothers I know is that she led her children out of Syria to safety in Lebanon after her husband was killed. Her children have witnessed war, death and destruction, but life must go on for this family. With no home to call their own; they are stateless.

They are refugees.

My new friend and her family join 65.3 million other individuals who have been displaced from their homes due to war, conflict or climate change. Nearly 1 in every 100 persons around the world are displaced from their homes and, on average, people remain displaced from their homes for 17 years. For my friend, this means she must plan a new future for her children: one that will occur outside the comfort of her own home.

Today, and everyday, we celebrate my new friend and the millions of other refugees around the world who are learning new languages, navigating differences in cultures and dreaming new futures for their children. We lift up their courage and strength, and trade fear for kindness.

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