Replace Fear with Kindness on World Refugee Day

A few short weeks ago, I visited the home of a single mother to three boys. She sat quietly next to me and we tried to nonverbally communicate through a series of smiles, nervous laughter and gestures. She reminded me of other mothers; strong, caring and loving. The difference between this mother and other mothers I know is that she led her children out of Syria to safety in Lebanon after her husband was killed. Her children have witnessed war, death and destruction, but life must go on for this family. With no home to call their own; they are stateless.

They are refugees.

My new friend and her family join 65.3 million other individuals who have been displaced from their homes due to war, conflict or climate change. Nearly 1 in every 100 persons around the world are displaced from their homes and, on average, people remain displaced from their homes for 17 years. For my friend, this means she must plan a new future for her children: one that will occur outside the comfort of her own home.

Today, and everyday, we celebrate my new friend and the millions of other refugees around the world who are learning new languages, navigating differences in cultures and dreaming new futures for their children. We lift up their courage and strength, and trade fear for kindness.

COMMENT
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Pinterest
In The News

The Root of Hunger and Poverty

Undernutrition is most devastating to children because it impairs both mental and physical growth. Hungry children have slower cognitive development than their peers, which often perpetuates the cycle of poverty. Some of the severe effects of undernutrition include: stunting, reduced adult income, decreased offspring birth weight and an increased risk of death.

Though nutrition is a complicated issue, it’s one of the best vehicles through which we can transform a child’s health, education and future. To better understand what it takes to foster healthy, well-nourished children, we continue to adapt our model to fit best practice according to leading research and experts.

“By working with national staff, we develop, coordinate, manage and evaluate the children’s feeding program, women’s empowerment and agriculture training.”

Ten years ago it was about filling a belly. Now, it’s about nourishing and caring for a whole person.

After starting the feeding program in Haiti, we met Ana. A few months later, we got to visit with her again. She looked healthier, stronger and happier. She recalled the exact moment Convoy of Hope started the program.

“That was the day my life changed forever,” she said.

When we started feeding children, we focused on the “one.” Though our strategy has changed, we will never lose this focus because we know the extraordinary starts with one meal, child, family and garden.

And one day soon, we hope the roots of hunger wither.

COMMENT
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Pinterest
Children's Feeding

Kindness Expands

In 2016, we witnessed short-term disaster responses turn into long-term programs in Nepal and Lebanon. The results for communities high in the Himalayas and on the outskirts of refugee camps in the Middle East have been life-changing. Thank you for enabling us to bring hope in such desperate circumstances. The growth of Convoy of Hope’s programs are a direct result of your kindness!


Nepal

In 2015, Convoy of Hope responded to a devastating earthquake in Nepal. In 2016, we added 600 children at four schools to our Children’s Feeding Initiative. In addition to the feeding program, we’ve also facilitated agriculture trainings to nearly 200 participants to address the underlying food security issues. Community members, teachers and parents are reporting significant changes in the village from these programs including better attendance because the children are sick less often.

Lebanon

Since 2014, we have worked with local partners to provide vital resources to refugees fleeing Syria including food, heaters, newborn health kits, hygiene kits, coats and more.  In 2016, we were able to implement an emergency-based feeding program in Lebanon serving 650 Lebanese and Syrian refugee children at two schools and refugee camps. We will continue to work with our partners in the area to serve even more children and families in these war-torn communities.


 

COMMENT
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Pinterest
Children's Feeding