Country: Honduras

New Business Helped Hally and Her Family Survive COVID-19

“The pandemic has affected us greatly,” Hally said solemnly. “My husband and sister lost their jobs … friends have provided us with food when we did not have any to eat.”

With little hope and few options, Hally wasn’t sure how she would feed her two children. But after learning about Convoy of Hope’s Women’s Empowerment program, she joined and quickly saw her life change for the better.

“I’ll never forget that day, when I entered and saw the whole issue,” she said. In the program, Hally learned financial skills, self-worth, and vocational development. Soon, she started seeing a difference.

“I am starting with the help they gave me,” Hally said. “I have created the habit of saving.” 

After starting a business of her own and putting her new-found skills to use, she helped her daughter join Convoy of Hope’s Girls’ Empowerment program.

“Little by little I start the business and little by little I can help at home,” Hally said. “In my family we have received 100% help … many times we did not have enough to eat and [Convoy of Hope] called to tell us that they brought us a bag of food. Thanks to Convoy I have been able to start my business.” 

With gratitude and a new trajectory in life, Hally has grown her business, supported her family, and taught her children life-altering skills.

“I have no words to express my gratitude to the people who support us through Convoy,” she said. “It has been very helpful for me, as well as for my family. I pray to God for the people of Convoy, so that they can always help people and God bless you always.”

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Program Updates

When the Odds Were Against Her, Margi Persevered

For many in Honduras, the struggle for hope is a part of daily living. Amidst regular droughts and hurricanes, Honduras is one of the poorest and most dangerous countries in Latin America, with approximately half of the population living below the poverty line.

Despite all of this, Margi still lives with hope. As a proactive and innovative entrepreneur, she participates in Convoy of Hope’s Women’s Empowerment program. This initiative helps people begin new lives with financial education, vocational training, cooperative saving groups, and start-up capital.

After opening a local grocery store, Margi began to see the cycle of hopelessness break in her life. Even when the pandemic struck, she and her store stood strong in the face of adversity.

“[The program] has been very helpful to me. I have learned to value myself, love myself, have self-confidence and realize that I am capable of achieving great things, which is why I have become an entrepreneurial woman,” Margi said. “Today I can see myself as a woman with clear goals and a vision of a life plan for the future.”

Thanks to her newfound confidence, stable source of income, and partnership with those who believe in her, she has persevered. As a light in her community, Margi has continued to thrive and encourage those around her.

Everything that one proposes in life can be achieved as long as we have the strength, attitude, and will to get ahead,” she said. To the people who make aid possible through Convoy, I say that they are doing an enormous job and I hope God blesses them so that they can continue supporting other people, just as they have done with me.”

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Women's Empowerment

Hope Starts Early: How Early Intervention Changed Zuri’s Story

“In my family, several people were left without work, so we had to find the means to bring food to our house,” Katherine said.

In many ways, the pandemic made life much more difficult for Katherine and her daughter, Zuri.

Less income meant more effort was required of Katherine to support her family. She and Zuri soon noticed an unintended consequence of their new normal. Since they were spending less time together, Zuri was missing out on a pivotal piece of her development as a young child.

Thanks to a visit from a friend, which then turned into a life-changing conversation, Katherine and Zuri began participating in Convoy of Hope’s Early Intervention program.

“I did not know that Convoy existed, but a sister came to my house and told me the work they do,” Katherine said. She went on to explain one of the most important things she has learned since enrolling in the program. “The way to help early intervention is that one should get involved with their children, dedicating more time to them, doing different exercises with them.”

Now, Katherine and Zuri spend time painting, drawing, and playing together. This ensures that Zuri has what she needs to learn and grow.

“I have never done something like this for her [before]. I read her stories at night and it is a special moment for both of us,” Katherine concluded. “We are very grateful.”

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Women's Empowerment

With Consistent Nourishment, Omar Realizes His Passions

“This place has changed my life in a lot of ways,” Omar said.

Since he was 3 years old, Omar has relied on one of Convoy of Hope’s program centers in Honduras to sustain him. Now 15, he has started pursuing a life outside the cycle of hopelessness.

“The food that we get here is different than what we get at home. Sometimes I don’t have food at home, but I know I will get food here,” Omar said.

Unfortunately, food insecurity was only one of the hurdles Omar had to overcome in his childhood. “My mom died when I was 6 years old, and my dad left. I was raised by my siblings,” he said. 

Despite the hardships he’s faced, Omar enjoys math and drawing. One day, he hopes to combine his passions and pursue a career as an architect. When he isn’t working on freelance projects, Omar remains devoted to furthering his education. “I’m just about to start at a technical school where I can study finance because I like math too.”

Ana Victoria, the director of the program center that Omar attends, takes pride in how nutritious the food is that Convoy of Hope provides. 

“The kids don’t normally get sick here,” Ana Victoria said. “We have very strong kids with a lot of energy.”

Omar’s program center serves 30 other kids. While there, they receive the nutrition they need to stay healthy, grow, and continue having hope.

To join us in changing lives and promoting healthy communities free from poverty and hunger, click here.

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Children's Feeding / Program Updates