Country: Tanzania

Head teacher Twati Mollel shows organic tomatoes growing in a greenhouse at his school near Arusha, Tanzania. Profit from the produce will feed students for years to come Head teacher Twati Mollel shows organic tomatoes growing in a greenhouse at his school near Arusha, Tanzania. Profit from the produce will feed students for years to come

10 tons of tomatoes grown in Tanzania increase sustainability

 

As the Tanzanian government increases its requirements for nonprofits, Convoy of Hope’s method of capacity building through nutrition programs has emerged as a leading model

For three days in December, high-ranking officials came from three government ministries to inspect Convoy of Hope’s programs. The delegation visited Ngaramtoni Primary School near Arusha, where Convoy has a feeding program.

What impressed the officials was the execution of Convoy’s plan in equipping the school to become self-sustaining, which enables the organization to move on and do the same with other schools.

Since Convoy entered Ngaramtoni in 2014, they’ve held community meetings, helped identify income generating opportunities, addressed hygiene and sanitation issues, empowered mothers to do business and taught students gardening techniques. The school is now poised to harvest and sell more than 10 metric tons of tomatoes per year, which will fund the lunch program in the future.

The officials asked Convoy of Hope to expand into other schools, and they marveled at how the organization invests in building capacity in the community.
“Where have you been all along!?” exclaimed one government official.

In fact, Convoy has received accolades from district government in recent years, and its development work has been featured on the evening news. Recognition from the national government, however, is new.

Michael Mlonga, who leads Convoy of Hope Tanzania, was summoned to Tanzania’s capital two weeks after the visit to present and train government officials on Convoy of Hope’s innovative model. “This is the new standard to which we want to uphold other NGOs involved in school-based feeding programs,” an official told Mlonga.

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Agriculture / In the News / Inspiration / News / Program Updates

Matilda: Changing her story through Women’s Empowerment

Matilda and her son, Junior, live in the beautiful country of Tanzania. Each morning, Matilda opens up her shop, confidently expecting another successful day of business. But, not too long ago, life looked very different for Matilda and Junior.

Despite working long hours making and selling donuts, oftentimes Matilda would not earn enough income to provide for Junior or herself … forcing both of them to go to bed hungry. Junior watched his mom struggle, and with wisdom beyond his years, he would encourage her that the next day would be better.

After Junior enrolled in a school benefiting from Convoy of Hope’s feeding program, Matilda enrolled in the Women’s Empowerment program. From then on, everything changed!

Now, Matilda sells many different items in her shop! She makes enough money for today and has also learned how to budget to save for the future.

Because of friends like you, women like Matilda — and their children — are receiving opportunities through Convoy of Hope that enable them to live better lives.

Thank you for helping change her story.


Click here to help us empower more women like Matilda.

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Field Story / Women's Empowerment

Kellen’s Story — From Impoverished to Empowered

Kellen Msseemmaa has been with Convoy of Hope in Tanzania since 2013 as the Director of Empowered Girls.

Kellen was born and raised in Uganda and experienced poverty firsthand as the firstborn of six children. They often only had one meal a day or sometimes — nothing at all. See how her passion for empowering girls has transformed countless lives!

Tell us about your background.

Girls were seen as an income, but I never accepted the negativity around me. I knew learning was the only way out of poverty so I worked and studied hard to become a teacher.

Why is Women’s Empowerment so important?

Through the program, women don’t just receive money — they are trained to become good entrepreneurs. They become self-sufficient and are able to feed their children.

You launched the Empowered Girls program. What was your motivation behind that?

As a teacher, I noticed many girls would stop attending classes because they were getting pregnant. From that, I had the idea to start Empowered Girls to teach all young women they have value.

What is your favorite part of your job?

The programs really work. The young girls dream of becoming doctors, engineers and scientists — women who can change the world. That’s my best part.

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Staff Spotlight