Tag: Feeding

World Refugee Day

Wars, conflict and persecution have forced more people to flee their homes and seek refuge and safety elsewhere than at any other time in recorded history. Today, there are 65 million refugees, more than half of whom are children. It is the greatest humanitarian crisis since WWII — and it will be the crisis that defines my generation.

Refugees are afraid, desperate, and often have nowhere to go. They’ve narrowly escaped the bombs and bullets, just to be slowly tormented on the inside by the humiliation of being chased away like criminals. Refugees are lost: physically, emotionally and spiritually.

Since the start of the crisis, Convoy of Hope has been able to help nearly 80,000 refugees with life-saving food rations, warm blankets and a message of hope in the Middle East and all along the route that refugees take to reach a safe haven. We are currently implementing an emergency-based Children’s Feeding Initiative for 350 hungry refugee children in Lebanon. This means these children can now attend school without worrying about having to try and earn a bit of money just so they can eat that day.  This might be the first time some have ever attended school. Many families have been in these refugee camps since the start of Syria’s civil war in 2011, causing this group of children to be called “the lost generation.”

Today, we celebrate the courage and strength of the 65 million displaced people around the world; it inspires us to work hard for the 30 million children who deserve their childhood.

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Children's Feeding / In The News / Program Updates

Clean Water and Hope in the Philippines

Mark’s mother did her best to take good care of him as a baby, but life at the base of a city landfill in the Philippines created many obstacles — such as unclean water — and a need for hope.

When U.S.-based worker Nate Shuck met Mark and his family, he could see the boy had just a few days left to live. Realizing they had no access to clean water or nutritious food, he worked to connect community leaders and a local church to help the family. They walked alongside her and the family, helping them gain access to purified water, baby formula and food with the nutrition they needed. Soon, Mark gained strength and became healthy.

When 2013’s Typhoon Haiyan devastated much of their island, Convoy of Hope’s Disaster Services team immediately began serving those affected. In partnership with local churches and Shuck, the team provided food, clean water and shelter in communities around the island.

Convoy of Hope leaders quickly saw opportunity to launch a strategic Children’s Feeding Initiative on the island, serving with local partners that helped during the disaster response.

Mark now attends first grade at a school where we launched a daily feeding program. Knowing other small children continue to struggle with severe malnourishment, Convoy serves healthy meals in a newly built community center at least 3-4 times a week to Mark and many others. Our Field Teams also worked to provide a clean water system at the center and created a fascinating and sustainable aquaponics program at the church.

Mark is now full of life, thanks to people like Nate Shuck and our partners who support our work throughout the world.

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Children's Feeding / Program Updates

World Health Day

Today, we celebrate World Health Day.

At Convoy of Hope, we help children and families become healthier around the world. Our work starts with a meal, but includes providing children with clean water, deworming pills, and hygiene lessons to work with new moms on how to best feed and take care of their children.  

We believe you can’t improve a child’s health without improving his or her nutritional status, and that’s why our driving passion to feed the world is synonymous with one to improve overall health. Since malnutrition is an underlying cause of 45% of all child deaths, the meals we distribute help reduce childhood mortality in some of the world’s poorest countries.

While the meal is critical, we also know that if a child is sick, they will not be able to absorb all of the nutrients — creating a negative cycle that’s hard to break. For example, a child can’t stay well-nourished if they’re drinking dirty water that causes diarrhea. That’s why our field staff work hard to make sure there is clean water for the children to drink. We’ve also started distributing deworming pills to children in areas where intestinal parasites are prevalent. These low-cost pills increase a child’s ability to absorb and utilize nutrients.

Today reminds of the six months I spent in Haiti where I was confronted with the effects of poor health on a daily basis. One of my tasks was to work with the local health director to ramp up nutrition and hygiene lessons in the schools. This required many hours in the office crafting schedules and developing lesson plans, but I am honored to be part of creating a healthier and happier world for nearly 150,000 children. We invite you to celebrate along with us. Happy World Health Day!

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Children's Feeding / Program Updates

I Am Syria

“I am Syria” is a powerful statement, especially coming from elementary school students in Charlotte, North Carolina. But that’s what the kids at the school wanted to do — make a statement.

Fourth and fifth graders at Nathaniel Alexander Elementary studied the refugee crisis and decided they wanted to do something to help kids who seemed just like them, but are facing the despair of living inside a humanitarian crisis.

“We try to focus on how we can do good for others,” says Nicole Nederlk, a teacher at the school. “It’s important for the kids to know what they’re giving towards.”

The kids raised money and wore green on a designated day to show their support. More than $500 was donated for Convoy of Hope’s response in the Middle East and Europe.

“I used to only care about myself,” says Danaiyah, a student at Nathaniel Alexander. “But now I know the importance of helping others.”

Jamie Waldron, outreach director for Elevation Church, helps out at the school in the food pantry and coordinates events. She recently visited Convoy’s work in Lebanon, so Jamie encouraged the kids to give the money they raised to Convoy of Hope. She showed them a video of the kids they would be helping.

“Some of the kids at Nathaniel Alexander don’t have much,” Waldron says. “But when they saw kids [on the video] that couldn’t go to school or didn’t have beds at all, they were moved to help.”

We’re thankful for children who are practicing compassion at such a young age. Because of them, we are able to bring hope and help to refugee children around the world.

 

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Advocacy / Inspiration / Join The Convoy